Category Archives: trends

Twenty Years of Generosity in the Netherlands

PaperARNOVA 2017 Presentation – Materials at Open Science Framework

In the past two decades, philanthropy in the Netherlands has gained significant attention, from the general public, from policy makers, as well as from academics. Research on philanthropy in the Netherlands has documented a substantial increase in amounts donated to charitable causes since data on giving in the Netherlands have become available in the mid-1990s (Bekkers, Gouwenberg & Schuyt, 2017). What has remained unclear, however, is how philanthropy has developed in relation to the growth of the economy at large and the growth of consumer expenditure. For the first time, we bring together all the data on philanthropy available from eleven editions of the Giving in the Netherlands survey among households (n = 16,344), to answer the research question: how can trends in generosity in the Netherlands in the past 20 years be explained?

 

The Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey

One of the strengths of the GINPS is the availability of data on prosocial values and attitudes towards charitable causes. In 2002, the Giving in the Netherlands survey among households was transformed from a cross-sectional to a longitudinal design (Bekkers, Boonstoppel & De Wit, 2017). The GIN Panel Survey has been used primarily to answer questions on the development of these values and attitudes in relation to changes in volunteering activities (Bekkers, 2012; Van Ingen & Bekkers, 2015; Bowman & Bekkers, 2009). Here we use the GINPS in a different way. First we describe trends in generosity, i.e. amounts donated as a proportion of income. Then we seek to explain these trends, focusing on prosocial values and attitudes towards charitable causes.

 

How generous are the Dutch?

Vis-à-vis the rich history of charity and philanthropy in the Netherlands (Van Leeuwen, 2012), the current state of giving is rather poor. On average, charitable donations per household in 2015 amounted to €180 per year or 0,4% of household income. The median gift is €50 (De Wit & Bekkers, 2017). In the past fifteen years, the trend in generosity is downward: the proportion of income has declined slowly but steadily since 1999 (Bekkers, De Wit & Wiepking, 2017). In 2015, giving as a proportion of income has declined by one-fifth of its peak in 1999 (see Figure 1).

GIV_CEX

Figure 1: Household giving as a proportion of consumer expenditure (Source: Bekkers, De Wit & Wiepking, 2017)

 

Why has generosity of households in the Netherlands declined?

The first explanation is declining religiosity. Because giving is encouraged by religious communities, the decline of church affiliation and practice has reduced charitable giving, as in the US (Wilhelm, Rooney & Tempel, 2007). The disappearance of religiosity from Dutch society has reduced charitable giving because the non-religious have become more numerous. The decline in religiosity explains about 40% of the decline in generosity we observe in the period 2001-2015. In Figure 2 we see a similar decline in generosity to religion (the red line) as to other organizations (the blue line).

REL_NREL

Figure 2: Household giving to religion (red) and to other causes (blue) as a proportion of household income (Source: Bekkers, De Wit & Wiepking, 2017)

 

We also find that those who are still religious have become much more generous. Figure 3 shows that the amounts donated by Protestants (the green line) have almost doubled in the past 20 years. The amounts donated by Catholics (the red line) have also doubled, but are much lower. The non-religious have not increased their giving at all in the past 20 years. However, the increasing generosity of the religious has not been able to turn the tide.

REL_DEN

Figure 3: Household giving by non-religious (blue), Catholics (red) and Protestants (green) in Euros (Source: Bekkers, De Wit & Wiepking, 2017)

The second explanation is that prosocial values have declined. Because generosity depends on empathic concern and moral values such as the principle of care (Bekkers & Ottoni-Wilhelm, 2016), the loss of such prosocial values has reduced generosity. Prosocial values have lost support, and the loss of prosociality explains about 15% of the decline in generosity. The loss of prosocial values itself, however, is closely connected to the disappearance of religion. About two thirds of the decline in empathic concern and three quarters of the decline in altruistic values is explained by the reduction of religiosity.

In addition, we see that prosocial values have also declined among the religious. Figure 4 shows that altruistic values have declined not only for the non-religious (blue), but also for Catholics (red) and Protestants (green).

REL_AV

Figure 4: Altruistic values among the non-religious (blue), Catholics (red) and Protestants (green) (Source: Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey, 2002-2014).

Figure 5 shows a similar development for generalized social trust.

REL_TRUST

Figure 5: Generalized social trust among the non-religious (blue), Catholics (red) and Protestants (green)  (Source: Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey, 2002-2016).

Speaking of trust: as donations to charitable causes rely on a foundation of charitable confidence, it may be argued that the decline of charitable confidence is responsible for the decline in generosity (O’Neill, 2009). However, we find that the decline in generosity is not strongly related to the decline in charitable confidence, once changes in religiosity and prosocial values are taken into account. This finding indicates that the decline in charitable confidence is a sign of a broader process of declining prosociality.

 

What do our findings imply?

What do these findings mean for theories and research on philanthropy and for the practice of fundraising?

First, our research clearly demonstrates the utility of including questions on prosocial values in surveys on philanthropy, as they have predictive power not only for generosity and changes therein over time, but also explain relations of religiosity with generosity.

Second, our findings illustrate the need to develop distinctive theories on generosity. Predictors of levels of giving measured in euros can be quite different from predictors of generosity as a proportion of income.

For the practice of fundraising, our research suggests that the strategies and propositions of charitable causes need modification. Traditionally, fundraising organizations have appealed to empathic concern for recipients and prosocial values such as duty. As these have become less prevalent, propositions appealing to social impact with modest returns on investment may prove more effective.

Also fundraising campaigns in the past have been targeted primarily at loyal donors. This strategy has proven effective and religious donors have shown resilience in their increasing financial commitment to charitable causes. But this is not a feasible long term strategy as the size of this group is getting smaller. A new strategy is required to commit new generations of donors.

 

 

References

Bekkers, R. (2012). Trust and Volunteering: Selection or Causation? Evidence from a Four Year Panel Study. Political Behavior, 32 (2): 225-247.

Bekkers, R., Boonstoppel, E. & De Wit, A. (2017). Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey – User Manual, Version 2.6. Center for Philanthropic Studies, VU Amsterdam.

Bekkers, R. & Bowman, W. (2009). The Relationship Between Confidence in Charitable Organizations and Volunteering Revisited. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 38 (5): 884-897.

Bekkers, R., De Wit, A. & Wiepking, P. (2017). Jubileumspecial: Twintig jaar Geven in Nederland. In: Bekkers, R. Schuyt, T.N.M., & Gouwenberg, B.M. (Eds.). Geven in Nederland 2017: Giften, Sponsoring, Legaten en Vrijwilligerswerk. Amsterdam: Lenthe Publishers.

Bekkers, R. & Ottoni-Wilhelm, M. (2016). Principle of Care and Giving to Help People in Need. European Journal of Personality, 30(3): 240-257.

Bekkers, R., Schuyt, T.N.M., & Gouwenberg, B.M. (Eds.). Geven in Nederland 2017: Giften, Sponsoring, Legaten en Vrijwilligerswerk. Amsterdam: Lenthe Publishers.

De Wit, A. & Bekkers, R. (2017). Geven door huishoudens. In: Bekkers, R., Schuyt, T.N.M., & Gouwenberg, B.M. (Eds.). Geven in Nederland 2017: Giften, Sponsoring, Legaten en Vrijwilligerswerk. Amsterdam: Lenthe Publishers.

O’Neill, M. (2009). Public Confidence in Charitable Nonprofits. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 38: 237–269.

Van Ingen, E. & Bekkers, R. (2015). Trust Through Civic Engagement? Evidence From Five National Panel Studies. Political Psychology, 36 (3): 277-294.

Wilhelm, M.O., Rooney, P.M. and Tempel, E.R. (2007). Changes in religious giving reflect changes in involvement: age and cohort effects in religious giving, secular giving, and attendance. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 46 (2): 217–32.

Van Leeuwen, M. (2012). Giving in early modern history: philanthropy in Amsterdam in the Golden Age. Continuity & Change, 27(2): 301-343.

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under Center for Philanthropic Studies, data, household giving, Netherlands, survey research, trends

Introducing Mega-analysis

How to find truth in an ocean of correlations – with breakers, still waters, tidal waves, and undercurrents? In the old age of responsible research and publication, we would collect estimates reported in previous research, and compute a correlation across correlations. Those days are long gone.

In the age of rat race research and publication it became increasingly difficult to do a meta-analysis. It is a frustrating experience for anyone who has conducted one: endless searches on the Web of Science and Google Scholar to collect all published research, input the estimates in a database, find that a lot of fields are blank, email authors for zero-order correlations and other statistics they had failed to report in their publications and get very little response.

Meta-analysis is not only a frustrating experience, it is also a bad idea when results that authors do not like do not get published. A host of techniques have been developed to find and correct publication bias, but the problem that we do not know the results that do not get reported is not solved easily.

As we enter the age of open science,  we do not have to rely any longer on the far from perfect cooperation from colleagues who have moved to a different university, left academia, died, or think you’re trying to prove them wrong and destroy your career. We can simply download all the raw data and analyze them.

Enter mega-analysis: include all the data points relevant for a certain hypothesis, cluster them by original publication, date, country, or any potentially relevant property of the research design, and add the substantial predictors you find documented in the literature. The results reveal not only the underlying correlations between substantial variables, but also the differences between studies, periods, countries and design properties that affect these correlations.

The method itself is not new. In epidemiology, and Steinberg et al. (1997) labeled it ‘meta-analysis of individual patient data’. In human genetics, genome wide association studies (GWAS) by large international consortia are common examples of mega-analysis.

Mega-analysis includes the file-drawer of papers that never saw the light of day after they were put in. It also includes the universe of papers that have never been written because the results were unpublishable.

If meta-analysis gives you an estimate for the universe of published research, mega-analysis can be used to detect just how unique that universe is in the milky way. My prediction would be that correlations in published research are mostly further from zero than the same correlation in a mega-analysis.

Mega-analysis bears great promise for the social sciences. Samples for population surveys are large, which enables optimal learning from variations in sampling procedures, data collection mode, and questionnaire design. It is time for a Global Social Science Consortium that pools all of its data. As an illustration, I have started a project on the Open Science Framework that mega-analyzes generalized social trust. It is a public project: anyone can contribute. We have reached mark of 1 million observations.

The idea behind mega-analysis originated from two different projects. In the first project, Erik van Ingen and I analyzed the effects of volunteering on trust, to check if results from an analysis of the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey (Van Ingen & Bekkers, 2015) would replicate with data from other panel studies. We found essentially the same results in five panel studies, although subtle differences emerged in the quantative estimates. In the second project, with Arjen de Wit and colleagues from the Center for Philanthropic Studies at VU Amsterdam, we analyzed the effects of volunteering on well-being conducted as part of the EC-FP7 funded ITSSOIN study. We collected 845.733 survey responses from 154.970 different respondents in six panel studies, spanning 30 years (De Wit, Bekkers, Karamat Ali & Verkaik, 2015). We found that volunteering is associated with a 1% increase in well-being.

In these projects, the data from different studies were analyzed separately. I realized that we could learn much more if the data are pooled in one single analysis: a mega-analysis.

References

De Wit, A., Bekkers, R., Karamat Ali, D., & Verkaik, D. (2015). Welfare impacts of participation. Deliverable 3.3 of the project: “Impact of the Third Sector as Social Innovation” (ITSSOIN), European Commission – 7th Framework Programme, Brussels: European Commission, DG Research.

Van Ingen, E. & Bekkers, R. (2015). Trust Through Civic Engagement? Evidence From Five National Panel StudiesPolitical Psychology, 36 (3): 277-294.

Steinberg, K.K., Smith, S.J., Stroup, D.F., Olkin, I., Lee, N.C., Williamson, G.D. & Thacker, S.B. (1997). Comparison of Effect Estimates from a Meta-Analysis of Summary Data from Published Studies and from a Meta-Analysis Using Individual Patient Data for Ovarian Cancer Studies. American Journal of Epidemiology, 145: 917-925.

Leave a comment

Filed under data, methodology, open science, regression analysis, survey research, trends, trust, volunteering

Five challenging questions on philanthropy

The recent success of the Ice Bucket Challenge for ALS across the world raises numerous questions on philanthropy. In this post I give some background information to answer five of these questions.

 

1. Where will it end?

It is hard to predict how much money will be raised for ALS through the Ice Bucket Challenge. Some two weeks after the campaign really took off it has raised more than £100 million according to this UK source.  The growth of donations to the ALS Association in the US now shows signs of decline, suggesting that the campaign is losing energy.

IceBucket_graph

Source: Tweet by Ethan O. Perlstein, August 29, 2014

If the S-shape in the graph above continues, total donations to the ALS Association in the US could reach $120 million.

IceBucket_graph_extra

 

2. Will other charities lose from the challenge?

It is often assumed that donors think about donations from a fixed annual budget: a dollar donated to the ALS Association cannot go to other charities. From this perspective, the Ice Bucket Challenge would come at the expense of other charities. However, it is also possible that the campaign does not affect other charities. There are many examples of campaigns that have not decreased amounts to other charities. In the Netherlands, the success of the Alpe d’Huzes bike rides against cancer has increased the amounts donated to the Dutch Cancer Society, while other health charities on average do not seem to have lost. Also for the Cancer Society itself the success of the bike ride has not come at the expense of regular fundraising campaigns, until questions were asked about the ‘no overhead costs’ policy promoted by the organizers of the event.

Also there is the possibility that people will donate more to health charities (or charities in general) because they become more aware of the need for donations. When I was nominated for the challenge by my wife my response was to donate to the Rare Diseases Foundation (ZZF), a Dutch foundation supporting research on a variety of rare diseases. My best bet is that the Ice Bucket Challenge is a fortuitous fundraising event that does not come at the expense of donations to other charities.

 

3. Is the success of the Ice Bucket Challenge ‘fair’ given the relative rarity of ALS as a disease?

Looking at all deaths in the course of a year, ALS is a relatively rare cause of death, as US data from the CDC show. Fi Douglas made a comparison with amounts donated, showing that donations do not seem to be directed towards the most lethal diseases.

diseases_donations

Source: Tweet by Fi Douglas, August 23, 2014

In a paper I published back in 2008, I compared donations to charities fighting groups of diseases and the number of deaths that these diseases cause. Giving in Netherlands to health charities seems more needs-based. It should be noted that the relatively high donations to charities fighting diseases of the nervous system is not due to the Netherlands ALS association, but mainly to other health charities.

Fundraising_Income_Needs_Netherlands_2008

 

4. What is the effectiveness of donations to the ALS Association?

When people think about the effectiveness of donations, they often look for financial information about revenues and expenses. These numbers have limited value, but let’s look at them for what they are worth. According to its annual report, the Netherlands ALS association raised €6.5 million in 2013 and spent about €7 million on research, dipping into its endowment. The costs of fundraising approached €0.5 million, a relatively low proportion relative to the ALS Association in the US (ALSA). The ALSA annual report tells us the association spent $7 million on research in 2013, and $3.6 million on fundraising, having raised a total of $29 million. One could say fundraising in the US is less effective, more difficult, or simply more expensive than in the Netherlands.

However, these numbers tell us nothing about the effectiveness of Ice Bucket Challenge donations. Their effectiveness depends completely on how the millions that are raised will be spent. From my limited knowledge on ALS it seems that the development of treatments or drugs against the disease is not on the verge of a breakthrough. Even though it would be premature to expect an effective ALS treatment any time soon, the sheer size of the amounts donated now will enable researchers to make some big steps. Now the stakes have been raised, donors may expect a well thought-through strategy of the ALS associations to spend the money in a responsible manner. The challenge for the ALS associations across the world is to manage donor expectations: to carefully communicate the uncertainty inherent in the development of medical innovations while avoiding disappointment and anger among donors expecting quick results.

Moreover, some have questioned the utility of health research charities relative to other charities, saying that there are more effective ways to spend donations. In the Netherlands this opinion was expressed by my colleague from Rotterdam, Kellie Liket, in one of the major national newspapers, De Volkskrant. Some of the responses to this op-ed piece have identified the same substitution logic that we saw above; a logic that can be questioned. More importantly, the opinion depends on the assumptions made about what counts towards the ‘effect’ of a donation. If we count lives saved per dollar contributed, medical research does not have a strong position in the debate. We can save many more lives by donating to improve health and living conditions in developing countries, where life is much less expensive to begin with. The same $100 buys more health in a poorer country, all else being equal. But this is not the health of people we know, or the health of loved ones who have suffered from a disease. It is our greater empathy for people close to us that makes us donate more readily to certain causes than others.

 

5. Why should we give to a certain cause or organization?

Perhaps the most fundamental question raised by the Ice Bucket Challenge is a moral one. While research on philanthropy may show that we give out of compassion for people we know, there are many other reasons for people to give to charity. The joy of giving, aversion of guilt, being asked to give or seeing someone else give, the desire to obtain prestige, or simply an unexpected windfall or a ray of sunshine can motivate people to give. What we think of these circumstances and reasons is a different matter. The wisdom on the ethics of giving is much older than the 120 years of empirical research on philanthropy since Thorstein Veblen’s description of donations by the late 19th century New York elite as forms of conspicuous consumption. In the 12th century, Maimonides described eight levels of charity. Giving in response to a request is lower than anonymous giving; the highest form of giving would make recipients self-reliant and their dependence on charity disappear. Because of its largely public nature, the Ice Bucket Challenge can be placed on the lower rungs of Rambam’s Golden Ladder of Charity; but you can choose your favorite manner of donating in response to the challenge. And who knows: in the very long run, even your grudgingly accepted challenge and public donation may contribute to a cure for ALS – making victims of the disease less dependent on the charity of their loved ones.

4 Comments

Filed under altruism, charitable organizations, household giving, philanthropy, psychology, trends

Valkuilen in het nieuwe systeem van toezicht op goededoelenorganisaties

Deze bijdrage verscheen op 27 januari op Filanthropium.nl.
Dank aan Theo Schuyt voor commentaar op een eerdere versie van dit stuk en aan Sigrid Hemels en Frans Nijhof voor correcties van enkele feitelijke onjuistheden. PDF? Klik hier.

De contouren van het toezicht op goededoelenorganisaties in de toekomst worden zo langzamerhand duidelijk. Het nieuwe systeem is een compromis dat op termijn veel kan veranderen, maar net zo goed een faliekante mislukking kan worden.

Hoe ziet het nieuwe systeem eruit?
In opdracht van de Minister van Veiligheid en Justitie heeft de Commissie De Jong een voorstel gedaan voor een nieuw systeem. De commissie stelt voor een Autoriteit Filantropie op te richten die de fondsenwervende goededoelenorganisaties moet registreren. De autoriteit is een nieuw orgaan dat onder het ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie valt, maar eigen wettelijke bevoegdheden krijgt. Burgers kunnen de registratie online raadplegen. Het uitgangspunt van het nieuwe systeem is een kostenbesparing. Geregistreerde goededoelenorganisaties hoeven geen keurmerk meer aan te vragen en krijgen automatisch toegang tot de markt voor fondsenwerving. Organisaties die geen fondsen werven zoals vermogensfondsen en organisaties die alleen onder hun leden fondsen werven zoals kerken hoeven zich niet te registreren. De autoriteit maakt de huidige registratie van Algemeen Nut Beogende Instellingen (ANBI’s) door de belastingdienst grotendeels overbodig.

Winnaars en verliezers
Het nieuwe systeem is een overwinning voor vijf partijen: de vermogensfondsen, de kerken, de bekende goededoelenorganisaties, het Ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie, en de Belastingdienst. De meeste vermogensfondsen en de kerken winnen in het nieuwe systeem omdat zij niet door de registratie heen hoeven wanneer zij geen fondsen werven onder het publiek. Zij blijven als ANBI’s geclassicificeerd bij de belastingdienst. De bekende goededoelenorganisaties winnen in het systeem omdat zij invloed krijgen op de criteria die voor registratie zullen gaan gelden. Het Ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie wint omdat zij volledige controle krijgt over goededoelenorganisaties. De Belastingdienst wint omdat zij afscheid kan nemen van een groot aantal werknemers die voor de registratie van goededoelenorganisaties zorgden.

De verliezers in het nieuwe systeem zijn de huidige toezichthouders op goededoelenorganisaties (waaronder het Centraal Bureau Fondsenwerving , CBF) en de kleinere goededoelenorganisaties. Het CBF verliest klanten omdat de nieuwe registratie gaat gelden als toegangsbewijs voor de Nederlandse markt voor fondsenwerving en daarmee het keurmerk van het CBF (en een aantal andere, minder bekende, keurmerken) overbodig maakt. De autoriteit filantropie krijgt de mogelijkheid overtreders te beboeten. De Belastingdienst heeft deze mogelijkheid in het huidige systeem niet, zij kan alleen de ANBI-status intrekken. Ook het CBF kan geen boetes innen, maar alleen het keurmerk intrekken.

De criteria waarop potentiële gevers goededoelenorganisaties kunnen gaan beoordelen zijn nog niet geformuleerd. Omdat de kleinere goededoelenorganisaties in Nederland niet of niet goed georganiseerd zijn is het lastig om hun belangen in de autoriteit filantropie een stem te geven. Het gevaar dreigt dat de grotere goededoelenorganisaties de overhand krijgen in de discussie over de regels. Ook is onduidelijk hoe streng de controle gaat worden. De belastingdienst gaat deze controle in ieder geval niet meer doen. De commissie stelt voor dat vooral voorafgaand aan de registratie controle plaatsvindt.

De winst- en verliesrekening voor de burger – als potentiële gever en belastingbetaler – is minder duidelijk. De kosten van de hele operatie zijn niet berekend. De commissie stelt voor dat alle organisaties die zich registreren om toegang te krijgen tot de Nederlandse markt voor fondsenwerving mee gaan betalen. Het ANBI-register telt momenteel zo’n 60.000 inschrijvingen; een deel betreft organisaties die zich in het nieuwe systeem niet meer hoeven te registreren (kerken, vermogensfondsen). Als er 20.000 registraties overblijven kan het nieuwe systeem voor de goededoelenorganisaties aanmerkelijk goedkoper worden. Op dit moment betalen 269 landelijk wervende goededoelenorganisaties voor het CBF-keurmerk. In het huidige systeem worden alle keurmerkhouders gecontroleerd. De autoriteit zal slechts steekproefsgewijs en bij klachten controles uitvoeren.

Gebrekkige probleemanalyse
Het advies vertrekt vanuit de probleemanalyse dat het vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties daalt door schandalen en affaires. Deze analyse is niet goed onderbouwd. De publieke verontwaardiging over de salariëring van (interim)managers zoals bij Plan Nederland en de Hartstichting in 2004 en het breken van (onmogelijke) beloften over gratis fondsenwerving zoals bij Alpe D’huZes vorig jaar bedreigen vooral de inkomsten van getroffen organisaties, niet de giften aan de goededoelensector als geheel. Het vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties daalt al tijden structureel, zo blijkt uit het Geven in Nederland onderzoek van de Vrije Universiteit en de peilingen van het Nederlands Donateurs Panel.

Vervolgens stelt het advies dat het doel van een nieuw systeem is om het vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties onder burgers te vergroten. Dat burgers in vertrouwen moeten kunnen geven door het nieuwe systeem lijkt een legitiem doel. Het is echter de vraag of overheid de imago- en communicatieproblemen van de goededoelensector op moet lossen. We zouden de sector daar immers ook zelf verantwoordelijk voor kunnen houden, zoals in de Verenigde Staten gebeurt. Voor het imago van de overheid en het vertrouwen in de politiek is het echter verstandig de controle op organisaties die fiscale voordelen krijgen waterdicht te maken, zodat er geen vragen komen over de doelmatigheid van de besteding van belastinggeld. Daarnaast is het vanuit de politieke keuze voor de participatiesamenleving verstandig meer inzicht te vragen in de prestaties van goededoelenorganisaties. Als burgers zelf meer verantwoordelijkheid krijgen voor het publiek welzijn via goededoelenorganisaties willen we wel kunnen zien of zij die verantwoordelijkheid inderdaad waarmaken. Dat zou via het register van de Autoriteit Filantropie kunnen.

Nieuw systeem zorgt niet automatisch voor meer vertrouwen
Het is echter de vraag of de burger door het nieuwe systeem ook inderdaad weer meer vertrouwen krijgt in goededoelenorganisaties. Het advies van de Commissie de Jong heeft veel details van het nieuwe systeem nog niet ingevuld. Vertrouwen drijft op de betrouwbaarheid van de controlerende instantie. Die organisatie moet onafhankelijk én streng zijn. Conflicterende belangen bedreigen het vertrouwen. Als de te controleren organisaties vertegenwoordigd zijn in de autoriteit of haar activiteiten kunnen beïnvloeden is zij niet onafhankelijk. Een gebrek aan controle is eveneens een risicofactor voor het publieksvertrouwen, vooral als er later problemen blijken te zijn. Het is belangrijk dat de autoriteit proactief handelt en niet slechts achteraf na gebleken onregelmatigheden een onderzoek instelt.

Blijkbaar is er iets mis met de huidige controle. De probleemanalyse van de commissie de Jong gaat ook op dit punt kort door de bocht. Het advies omschrijft niet hoe de controle op goededoelenorganisaties op dit moment plaatsvindt. De commissie analyseert evenmin wat de problemen zijn in het huidige systeem. Op dit moment gebeurt de controle op goededoelenorganisaties niet door de overheid. De belastingdienst registreert ‘Algemeen nut beogende instellingen’ (ANBI’s), maar controleert deze instellingen nauwelijks als ze eenmaal geregistreerd zijn.

Sterke en zwakke punten van het huidige systeem
In feite heeft de overheid de controle op goededoelenorganisaties nu uitbesteed aan een vrije markt van toezichthouders. Dit zijn organisaties zoals het CBF die keurmerken verstrekken. In theorie is dit een goed werkend systeem omdat de vrijwillige deelname een signaal van kwaliteit geeft aan potentiële donateurs. Goededoelenorganisaties kunnen ervoor kiezen om aan eisen te voldoen die aan deze keurmerken zijn verbonden. Organisaties die daarvoor kiezen willen en kunnen openheid geven; de organisaties die dat niet doen laden de verdenking op zich dat zij minder betrouwbaar zijn. Het systeem werkt als de toezichthouder onafhankelijk is, de controle streng, en de communicatie daarover effectief. Het CBF heeft in de afgelopen jaren echter verzuimd om de criteria scherp te hanteren en uit te leggen aan potentiële donateurs. Het CBF-Keur stelt bijvoorbeeld geen maximum aan de salarissen van medewerkers. Ook bij de onafhankelijkheid kunnen vragen worden gesteld. De grote goededoelenorganisaties zijn met twee afgevaardigden van de VFI vertegenwoordigd in het CBF, en zijn daarnaast in feite klanten die betalen voor de kosten van het systeem. Zij hebben er belang bij de eisen niet aan te scherpen omdat dan de kosten te hoog oplopen.

Twee valkuilen
In het nieuwe systeem dreigen zowel de onafhankelijkheid als de pakkans voor problemen te zorgen. De commissie laat het aan de autoriteit over om te bepalen welke regels zullen worden gehanteerd. Maar wie komen er in die autoriteit? De commissie beveelt aan ‘diverse belanghebbenden (sector, wetenschap, overheid)’ in het bestuur van de autoriteit te laten vertegenwoordigen. Het is echter onduidelijk welke partijen er in de autoriteit precies zitting krijgen, en in welke machtsverhoudingen. Wel is duidelijk dat de autoriteit in eerste instantie uitgaat van het zelfregulerend vermogen van de sector. De goededoelenorganisaties mogen dus zelf met voorstellen komen voor de regels. De commissie legt de verantwoordelijkheid voor de vaststelling van de regels vervolgens bij de overheid, en meer in het bijzonder bij de Minister van Veiligheid en Justitie. Het is dan de vraag in hoeverre de minister gevoelig is voor de lobby van goededoelenorganisaties.

De commissie stelt ook voor de controle op grond van risicoanalyses uit te voeren en om af te gaan op klachten. Dat kan in de praktijk voldoende blijken te zijn. Het nieuwe systeem neemt echter als uitgangspunt de kosten te minimaliseren. Deze kosten moeten bovendien door de te controleren goededoelenorganisaties worden opgebracht. Zij krijgen er belang bij de controle licht en oppervlakkig mogelijk te maken. Als er onvoldoende controle plaatsvindt, zoals in de Verenigde Staten het geval is, zullen ook geregistreerde organisaties onbetrouwbaar blijken te zijn. Dit is natuurlijk helemaal desastreus voor het vertrouwen.

De commissie de Jong stelt bovendien voor dat alle fondsenwervende goededoelenorganisaties van enige betekenisvolle omvang verplicht geregistreerd worden. Het nieuwe systeem biedt geen zicht op de prestaties van vermogensfondsen en kerken omdat zij onder de belastingdienst blijven vallen. Zij krijgen een voorkeursbehandeling omdat zij geen fondsen werven, of alleen onder leden. Dit is een oneigenlijk argument. Het criterium van algemeen nut betreft niet de herkomst van de fondsen, maar de prestaties. Ook de activiteiten van kerken en vermogensfondsen moeten ten goede komen aan het algemeen nut.

Het middel van verplichte registratie is waarschijnlijk niet effectief in het vergroten van het publieksvertrouwen. Een verplichte registratie heeft geen signaalfunctie voor potentiële donateurs. Als alle goededoelenorganisaties aan de eisen voldoen, zijn ze dan allemaal even betrouwbaar? Dat is niet erg waarschijnlijk. Ofwel de lat wordt in het nieuwe systeem zo laag gelegd dat alle organisaties er overheen kunnen springen, ofwel de lat wordt op papier weliswaar hoog gelegd maar in de praktijk stelt de controle niets voor.

Het zou veel beter zijn de autoriteit een vrijwillig sterrensysteem te laten ontwerpen waarin donateurs kunnen zien hoe professioneel de organisatie is aan het aantal sterren die onafhankelijke controle heeft opgeleverd. Donateurs kunnen dan professionelere organisaties verkiezen, voor zover ze bereid zijn daarvoor te betalen tenminste. Geld werven kost geld, en geld effectief besteden ook. Met een financiële bijsluiter kan de autoriteit filantropie inzichtelijk maken wat de te verwachten risico’s zijn van private investeringen in goededoelenorganisaties. Zo dwingt de markt de goededoelenorganisaties tot concurrentie op prestaties voor het publiek welzijn. Een waarlijk onafhankelijke autoriteit die scherp controleert op naleving van (naar keuze) strenge of minder strenge regels is ook binnen die contouren mogelijk en lijkt mij gezien de maatschappelijke betekenis van de filantropie in Nederland van belang.

2 Comments

Filed under charitable organizations, corporate social responsibility, foundations, fraud, household giving, incentives, law, philanthropy, policy evaluation, politics, taxes, trends, trust

Update: Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey User Manual

A new version of the User Manual for the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey is now available: version 2.2.

The GINPS12 questionnaire is here (in Dutch).

Leave a comment

Filed under data, empathy, experiments, helping, household giving, methodology, philanthropy, principle of care, survey research, trends, trust, volunteering, wealth

Tien Filantropie Trends

  1. Nalatenschappen: goededoelenorganisaties ontvangen steeds meer inkomsten uit nalatenschappen, naar verwachting €86 miljard tot 2059.
  2. Evenementen: goededoelenorganisaties ontvangen steeds meer inkomsten uit evenementen zoals Alpe d’Huzes waar enthousiaste vrijwilligers sponsorgelden voor werven.
  3. Werknemersvrijwilligerswerk: bedrijven sponsoren steeds minder direct met geld, en sturen hun medewerkers liever op maatschappelijk verantwoord teamuitje zoals NL Doet.
  4. Vertrouwen onder druk: het traditioneel hoge niveau van vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties daalt structureel en lijdt incidenteel verlies door ophef over salarissen.
  5. Lokalisering: lokale nonprofit organisaties zoals musea en ziekenhuizen gaan fondsenwerven, internationale hulporganisaties ontvangen steeds minder.
  6. Dynamiek in geefgedrag: donateurs zijn steeds minder trouw aan goededoelenorganisaties en doen vaker incidentele giften zoals bij sponsoracties.
  7. Druk op het waterbed: de overheid bezuinigt en probeert burgers meer bij te laten bijdragen, onder meer door fiscale maatregelen zoals de Geefwet.
  8. Meer transparantie:  goededoelenorganisaties in het ANBI-register worden per 1 januari 2014 verplicht openheid te geven over hun financiën en beleid.
  9. Doe-het-zelf filantropie met crowdfunding: steeds vaker werven mensen geld voor hun eigen goede doel via sociale media en geefplatforms zoals Voordekunst.nl
  10. Mega-donors: terwijl de giften van het mediane huishouden afnemen, geven vermogende Nederlanders steeds meer.

1 Comment

Filed under charitable organizations, corporate social responsibility, crowdfunding, foundations, household giving, law, politics, taxes, trends, volunteering, wealth