Category Archives: fundraising

Four misunderstandings about research on philanthropy

“What do people misunderstand about your research?” A great question that allows me to correct a few popular ideas about our research on philanthropy.

1. Who pays you? The first misunderstanding is that charities pay for our research on philanthropy. We understand that you would think that, because for charitable organizations it is useful to know what makes people give. After all, they are in the business of fundraising. On the other hand, you would not assume that second hand car dealers or diamond traders fund research on trust or that ski resort owners would fund climate change research. We are talking to foundations and fundraising organizations about the insights from our work that may help them in their business, but the work itself is funded primarily by the Ministry of Justice and Security of the government of the Netherlands and by the DG Research & Innovation of the European Commission.

2. What is the best charity? The second misunderstanding is that we vet charities and foundations, like we are some sort of philanthropy police. We don’t rate effective charities or give prizes for the best foundations, nor do we keep lists of bad apples in the philanthropy sector. We don’t track the activities that charities spend their funds on, or how much is ‘actually going to the cause’. If you need this kind of information, check the annual reports of organizations. We do warn the public that raising money costs money and that organizations saying they have no overhead costs are probably doing something wrong.

3. What is altruism? The third misunderstanding is that altruism is a gift that entails a sacrifice. You can hear this when people give each other compliments like: “That is very altruistic of you!” When people give to others despite the fact that they have little themselves and giving is costly, we tend to think this gift is worth more than a relatively small gift by a wealthy person. The term you are looking for here is generosity, not altruism. Altruism is a gift motivated by a concern for the well-being of the recipient. How much of the giving we see is altruism is one of the key questions on philanthropy. Which conditions make people give out of altruism, and what kind of people are more likely to do so, is a very difficult question to answer, because it is so difficult to isolate altruism from egoistic motivations for giving.

4. Crowding-in. The fourth misunderstanding is that less government implies more philanthropy. You can hear this in statements like “Americans give so much because the government there does so little”. The desire to have a small government is a political goal in itself, not an effective way to increase philanthropy. As government spending increases, citizens do not give less, and conversely, as government spending decreases, citizens do not give more. In the past decades, giving in the USA as a proportion of GDP is essentially a flat line with some fluctuation around 2%, even though government spending has increased enormously in this period. Also countries in which government spending as a proportion of GDP is higher are not necessarily countries in which people give more. In Europe, we even see a negative relationship: as citizens pay more taxes, a higher proportion of the population gives to charity. Learn more about this by reading my lecture ‘Values of Philanthropy’ at the 13th ISTR Conference we organized at VU Amsterdam.

 

PS – It was the tweet below (link here) that prompted this post:

misunderstanding

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under altruism, Center for Philanthropic Studies, charitable organizations, contract research, data, Europe, fundraising, household giving, Netherlands, regulation, taxes, VU University

Een gedragscode voor werving nalatenschappen door goede doelen

In 1Vandaag zei ik op 19 februari dat er in Nederland geen gedragscode voor de werving van nalatenschappen bestaat. Dit blijkt niet waar, er is wel degelijk een richtlijn voor nalatenschappenwerving. In de regels van het Centraal Bureau Fondsenwerving voor het CBF-Keur en op de website van de VFI (Vereniging voor Fondsenwervende Instellingen), branchevereniging voor goede doelen, is deze richtlijn echter niet te vinden. De VFI heeft wel een richtlijn voor de afwikkeling van nalatenschappen. Maar die gaat over de afwikkeling, als het geld al binnen is. Niet over de werving van nalatenschappen.

Het blijkt dat de richtlijn voor de werving van nalatenschappen is gepubliceerd door een derde organisatie, het Instituut Fondsenwerving. Deze organisatie heeft in 2012 een richtlijn opgesteld voor fondsenwervende instellingen die nalatenschappen werven. De richtlijn is niet verplichtend. Het Instituut Fondsenwerving heeft ook een gedragscode waar haar leden zich aan hebben te houden, maar de richtlijn voor nalatenschappen heeft niet de status van gedragscode. Bij het Instituut Fondsenwerving zijn volgens de ledenlijst 231 goede doelen organisaties aangesloten (klik hier voor een overzicht in Excel). Het Leger des Heils is lid van het IF, maar de Zonnebloem niet. Ook andere grote ontvangers van nalatenschappen, zoals KWF Kankerbestrijding, ontbreken op de ledenlijst. Zij zijn wel lid van de VFI, dat 113 leden en 11 aspirant leden telt.

De VFI reageerde op de uitzending via haar website en vermeldde de richtlijn van het Instituut Fondsenwerving. De status van de richtlijn is in de reactie opgehoogd naar een gedragscode. Dit zou betekenen dat leden die zich niet aan de richtlijn houden, kunnen worden geroyeerd. Gosse Bosma, directeur van de VFI, zei overigens in de 1Vandaag uitzending dat de VFI niet is nagegaan of de betrokken leden zich aan de richtlijn hebben gehouden en dat ook niet nodig te vinden. Het IF zelf heeft niet gereageerd. Ook de ontvangende goede doelen, de Zonnebloem en het Leger des Heils, reageerden deze week via het vaktijdschrift voor de filantropie, Filanthropium. Zij verklaarden zich bereid onrechtmatigheden te corrigeren. Wordt ongetwijfeld vervolgd in de volgende fase van deze zaak, of wanneer een nieuwe zaak zich aandient.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under bequests, charitable organizations, fundraising, incentives, law, philanthropy, regulation