Category Archives: foundations

Philanthropy: from Charity to Prosocial Investment

Contribution to the March 2016 edition of the European Research Network on Philanthropy (ERNOP) newsletter. PDF version here.

Philanthropy can take many forms. It ranges from the student who showed up at my doorstep with a collection tin to raise small contributions for legal assistance to the poor to the recent announcement by Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan of the establishment of a $42 billion charitable foundation. The media focused on the question why Zuckerberg and Chan would put 99% of their wealth in a foundation. The legal form of the foundation allowed Zuckerberg to keep control over the shares without having to pay taxes. Leaving aside the difficult question what motivation the legal form confesses for the moment, my point is that a change is taking place in the face that philanthropy takes.

Entrepreneurial forms of philanthropy, manifesting a strategic investment orientation, become more visible. We see them in social impact bonds, in social enterprises, in venture philanthropy and in the investments of foundations in the development of new drugs and treatments. A reliable count of the prevalence of such prosocial investments is not available, but 2015 was certainly a memorable year: the first Ebola vaccine was produced in a lab funded by the Wellcome Trust and polio was eradicated from Africa through coordinated efforts supported by a coalition of the WHO, Unicef, the Rotary International Foundation, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Of course there are limitations to philanthropy. Some problems are just too big to handle, even for the wealthiest foundations on earth, using the most innovative forms of investments. The refugee crisis continues to challenge the resilience of Europe. NGOs are delivering relief aid in the most difficult circumstances. But these efforts are band aids, as long as political leaders are struggling to gather the will power to solve it together.

The Zuckerberg/Chan announcement revived previous critiques of philanthrocapitalism. Isn’t it dangerous to have so much money in so few hands? Can we rely on wealthy foundations to invest in socially responsible ways? Foundations are the freest institutions on earth and can take risks that governments cannot afford. But the track records of the corporations that gave rise to the current foundation fortunes are not immaculate, monopolizing markets and evading taxes. Wealthy foundations can have a significant impact on society and influence public policy, limiting the influence of governments. It is political will that enables the existence and facilitates the fortune of wealthy foundations. Ultimately, the realization that the interests of the people should not be harmed enables the activities of foundations. Hence the talk about the importance of giving back to society.

The sociologist Alvin Gouldner is famous for his 1960 article ‘The Norm of Reciprocity’, which describes how reciprocity works. He also wrote a second classic, much less known: ‘The Importance of Something for Nothing.’ In this follow-up (1973), he stresses the norm of beneficence: “This norm requires men to give others such help as they need. Rather than making help contingent upon past benefits received or future benefits expected, the norm of beneficence calls upon men to aid others without thought of what they have done or what they can do for them, and solely in terms of a need imputed to the potential recipient.” In a series of studies I co-authored with Mark Ottoni-Wilhelm, an economist from the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University, we call this norm ‘the principle of care’.

With this quote I return to the question about motivation. The letter to their daughter in which Zuckerberg and Chan announced their foundation reveals noble concerns for the future of mankind. It is not their child’s need that motivated them, but the needs of the world in which she is born. This is the genesis of true philanthropy. Pretty much like the awareness of need that the law student demonstrated at my doorstep.

References

Bekkers, R. & Ottoni-Wilhelm, M. (2016). Principle of Care and Giving to Help People in Need. European Journal of Personality.  

Gouldner, A.W. (1960). The Norm of Reciprocity: A Preliminary Statement. American Sociological Review, 25 (2): 161-178. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2092623

Gouldner, A.W. (1973). The Importance of Something for Nothing. In: Gouldner, A.W. (Ed.). For Sociology, Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Wilhelm, M.O., & Bekkers, R. (2010). Helping Behavior, Dispositional Empathic Concern, and the Principle of Care. Social Psychology Quarterly, 73 (1): 11-32.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under altruism, charitable organizations, foundations, law, philanthropy, principle of care, taxes

Resilience and Philanthropy

This post in pdf

With the year 2020 on the horizon, the recently published work programme for Research & Innovation from European Commission for the years 2016-2017 is organized around a limited set of Societal Challenges. Europe defined these challenges after a long process of lobbying and consultation with many stakeholders. Going through the list I could not help thinking that something was missing. I do not mean that the list of challenges is a result of a political process and does not seem to reflect an underlying vision of Europe. I am thinking about the current refugee crisis. The stream of refugees arriving at the gates of Europe poses new challenges to Europe, in many areas: humanitarian assistance, citizenship, poverty, inclusion, access to education, and jobs. The stream of refugees also raises important questions for philanthropy. How will Europe deal with these challenges? How resilient is Europe? Will governments, nonprofit organizations and citizens be able to deal with this challenge? In the definition of the Rockefeller Foundation, resilience is the capacity of individuals, communities and systems to survive, adapt, and grow in the face of stress and shocks, and even transform when conditions require it. I define resilience as the mobilization of resources for the improvement of welfare in the face of adversity.

Among refugees, who are seeking a better future for themselves and their children, we see resilience. Threatened by adversity in their home countries, they take grave risks by placing their fate in the hands of human traffickers, foreign police officers. They rely on each other and their inner strength, hoping that what they left behind is worse than their future. We see a lack of resilience in Europe. The continent was not ready for the large stream of refugees. Some member states pass on the stream to each other by closing their borders. Other national governments try to accommodate refugees seeking asylum, but face barriers in finding housing, and resistance from groups of citizens who oppose accommodation of refugees in their communities. At the same time we see a willingness to help among other citizens, who offer assistance in the form of volunteer time, food and other goods. Perhaps the response of citizens is related to their own levels of resilience.

Resilience is not just the ability to withstand adversity or change by not changing at all. Resilience is not just sitting it out, or a strategy based on a rational computation of risks, the avoidance of risks, or flexibility and absorption of shocks. The resilient actor adapts to new situations and grows.  Neither is resilience an immutable trait of individuals, a matter of luck in the genetic lottery. Resilience has often been studied at the individual level in psychology. Resilience requires will power, perseverance, self-esteem, creativity, a proactive attitude, optimism, intrinsic motivation, inner strength, a long term orientation to the future, willingness to change for the better, risk-taking, using the force of your opponent, problem solving ability, and intelligence.

The questions for research on resilience require social scientists to study not only the response of individual citizens, but also of social systems: informal networks of citizens, social groups, nonprofit organizations, nations, and supra-national institutions. How are resilience-related traits related to philanthropy at the level of groups and systems? How can resilience among organizations be fostered? How do nonprofit organizations build and on resilience of target groups? Resilience is a very useful concept to apply to each of the societal challenges of Europe. The classic welfare state was a system that created resilience for society as a whole, reducing the need for resilience among individual citizens. The modern activating welfare state requires resilience among citizens as a condition for support. Welfare state support becomes more like charity: we favor victims of natural disasters that try to make the best of their lives and welfare recipients that are actively seeking a job.

As nonprofit organizations are trying to respond to the refugee crisis, they are also facing adversity themselves. In the United Kingdom, fundraising practices by charities have recently come under attack. In the Dutch nonprofit sector, cuts in government funding to arts and culture organizations have been a major source of adversity in the past years. Further cuts have been announced to organizations in international relief and development. In our research at the Center for Philanthropic Studies at VU Amsterdam we have asked: how willing are Dutch citizens to increase private contributions to charities when the government is lowering their financial support? Not much, is what our research shows. While some may have believed that citizens would compensate lower income from government grants through increased donations, this has not happened. When the cuts to the arts and culture organizations were announced, the minister for Education, Arts and Science said that cultural organizations should do more to raise funds from private sources and should rely less on government grants. The culture change in the cultural sector is taking place, slowly. Some organizations were not ready for this change and simply discontinued their activities. Most have decided to do with less, and see what opportunities they may have to increase fundraising income. Some have done well. On the whole, the increase in private contributions is marginal, and much less than the loss in government grants.

For nonprofit organizations, the refugee crisis poses a challenge, but also an opportunity to mobilize citizen support in an effective manner. By offering their support to the government, working together effectively, and channeling the willingness to volunteer they can demonstrate the societal impact that nonprofit organizations may have. This would be a much needed demonstration when trust in charitable organizations is low.

Leave a comment

Filed under disaster relief, empathy, Europe, foundations, helping, impact, Netherlands, philanthropy, psychology, trust

De veerkracht van de filantropie

[*]

Deze tekst als pdf downloaden

Burgerkracht, lokale actie, de doe-democratie, de participatiesamenleving: we komen deze termen steeds vaker tegen in de politiek, de media en beleidsstukken van de overheid en adviesorganen. De termen fungeren in een fundamenteel debat over de verdeling van verantwoordelijkheid van burgers en de overheid voor het welzijn van anderen en de samenleving. Het uitgangspunt van deze stukken is de autonome, zelfredzame burger, die geen overheidsregeling nodig heeft om voor zichzelf, de eigen omgeving en de samenleving te zorgen.

Bij dit uitgangspunt past de filantropie, gedefinieerd als vrijwillige bijdragen van geld en tijd aan het algemeen nuttige doelen zoals gezondheid, cultuur, onderwijs, natuur en levensbeschouwing. Die bijdragen komen niet alleen van levende burgers, maar ook van overledenen (via nalatenschappen), van bedrijven, vermogensfondsen, en van goededoelenloterijen. In 2013 ging er in de filantropie in totaal zo’n €4,4 miljard om. In 2011 spraken het kabinet en de sector filantropie af intensiever samen te werken aan de kwaliteit van de samenleving. Door het activerende beleid doet de overheid een groter beroep op vrijwillige bijdragen in de vorm van geld en tijd en neemt de maatschappelijke betekenis van filantropie toe.

In theorie biedt voorziening van maatschappelijke doelen en collectieve arrangementen uit vrijwilligheid een voordeel boven verplichting via belasting of een andere vrijheidsbeperking. Via vrijwillige bijdragen krijgen burgers meer controle over de kwaliteit van de samenleving en kunnen ze daar ook met recht trots op zijn. Burgers dragen liever vrijwillig bij aan maatschappelijke doelen dan via een verplichte belasting of via verplichte maatschappelijke dienstverlening.

De voorkeur voor vrijwillige bijdragen is niet alleen psychologisch in de vorm van een ‘goed gevoel’. Een experiment van Harbaugh, Mayr en Burghart (2007) maakte deze voorkeur zichtbaar door middel van hersenscans van Amerikaanse vrouwen die een grotere activiteit in het ‘genotscentrum’ in de hersenen vertoonden als zij een bedrag aan een goed doel gaven dan wanneer hetzelfde bedrag namens hen door de experimentleiders werd gegeven. Er kan ook voor burgers een materieel voordeel zitten aan vrijwillige bijdragen in de vorm van vrijwilligerswerk. Er is veel onderzoek dat laat zien dat vrijwilligers gelukkiger zijn, grotere sociale netwerken hebben, langer gezond blijven en uiteindelijk langer leven dan maatschappelijk minder betrokken burgers.

Filantropie verhoogt de kwaliteit van leven omdat zij zich richt op de aanpak van maatschappelijke problemen en de realisatie van maatschappelijke idealen. Het besef groeit dat effectieve oplossingen een goede samenwerking tussen overheden, bedrijven en burgers vereisen. Een eenzijdige aanpak van bovenaf door een nationale overheid ligt steeds minder voor de hand. Bijdragen van burgers en bedrijven, in de vorm van maatschappelijk verantwoord ondernemen, vrijwilligerswerk, crowdfunding en actieve burgerparticipatie zijn welkom op uiteenlopende gebieden als integratie, cultuur, zorg, veiligheid, natuurbehoud en duurzaamheid.

De aandacht voor filantropie van de overheid is een herontdekking van een rijk verleden. Een mooi historisch voorbeeld is de manier waarop volgens de Amerikaanse journalist Russell Shorto (2005) de bouw van de Walstraat in Nieuw Amsterdam werd gefinancierd. Op Wall Street in New York, waar nu het centrum van het kapitalisme is gevestigd, stond ooit een muur die de inwoners van de stad tegen de indianen, de Engelsen en de Zweden moest beschermen. Omdat er geen overheid was die belasting kon heffen werd de bouw van de wal gefinancierd met vrijwillige bijdragen van de burgers van Nieuw Amsterdam, waarbij van de meer vermogende inwoners een grotere bijdrage werd verwacht. Zij hadden ook meer te verliezen bij een inval. Latere voorbeelden, dichterbij huis, zijn het Vondelpark, de Vrije Universiteit en de grote musea in Amsterdam: voor een groot deel gefinancierd met schenkingen van vermogende particulieren.

Met het beroep op burgers keert de overheid terug naar deze tijden. De omstandigheden zijn in sommige opzichten gelijkaardig. Opnieuw is er grote welvaart in Nederland, die opnieuw zeer ongelijk verdeeld is. Er zijn echter ook grote verschillen. De vraag om vrijwillige bijdragen komt in een tijd waarin burgers gewend zijn aan een overheid die voor hen zorgt. Bovendien komt de vraag in een tijd van economische onzekerheid en bezuinigingen op overheidsuitgaven. Het beroep op vrijwillige bijdragen vraagt veerkracht van burgers. De Rockefeller Foundation (2015) definieert veerkracht als de capaciteit van mensen, gemeenschappen en instituties om zich voor te bereiden op schokken en langdurige belasting, zich daar tegen te verzetten en ervan te herstellen. Veerkracht komt niet alleen tot uiting in zelfredzaamheid, maar ook in het mobiliseren van hulp en het aanboren van nieuwe hulpbronnen. Het gevoel van gemeenschap, het besef dat je met elkaar meer kunt bereiken dan alleen, en het vertrouwen in anderen helpen daar bij. Deze factoren zijn ook cruciaal voor de filantropie.

De sector filantropie is in Nederland in de afgelopen decennia niet gegroeid vanuit tegenslag en bedreiging. Integendeel. In de jaren ’90 hadden we geen last van crisis en groeide de sector als kool, nog veel harder dan de economie. De sector organiseerde en professionaliseerde zich. Er kwamen brancheverenigingen, gedragscodes, keurmerken, toezichthouders, er kwamen opleidingen en er kwam onderzoek dat de sector filantropie in kaart bracht. Die gehele ontwikkeling vond plaats in het laatste decennium van de jaren ’90 zonder dat er grote problemen waren. De filantropie is groot geworden in een tijd van voorspoed, zonder veel bemoeienis en grotendeels buiten het blikveld van de overheid. Vanuit de betrokkenheid van Nederlanders. Niet zozeer om maatschappelijke problemen op te lossen, maar ook – en misschien wel vooral – om idealen te verwezenlijken. Filantropie is de uiting bij uitstek van de veerkracht van de samenleving. Uit de filantropie van een samenleving blijkt waar burgers om geven, wat zij goede doelen vinden en hoeveel zij ervoor over hebben.

De economische crisis waarin Nederland in 2009 terecht is gekomen heeft een beroep gedaan op de veerkracht van burgers. Het zijn niet zozeer de korte termijn fluctuaties in de hoogte van inkomens, de werkloosheid of het consumentenvertrouwen die samenhangen met de lange termijn trend in het geefgedrag. Het gaat eerder om de economische zekerheid op de lange termijn: de waarde van giften van geld aan goede doelen houdt sinds 1965 gelijke tred met de ontwikkeling van de vermogens van Nederlanders. Sinds 1985 volgt de ontwikkeling in de hoogte van de giften in Nederland vrijwel exact de ontwikkeling in de hoogte van de waarde van onroerend goed.

consumptie_filantropie_onroerendgoed_08_13

Consumptieve bestedingen van huishoudens (nationaal) en totaal vermogen van huishoudens in de vorm van onroerend goed volgens het CBS en de waarde van filantropie door huishoudens volgens Geven in Nederland (niet gecorrigeerd voor inflatie)

De filantropie in Nederland lijkt minder gevoelig te zijn voor economische tegenwind dan die van de Verenigde Staten en het Verenigd Koninkrijk, waar de inkomsten voor goededoelenorganisaties flink daalden in 2008 en 2009 en daarna nauwelijks stegen. Pas in 2012 zagen de goededoelenorganisaties in de VS hun inkomsten weer toenemen. In Nederland bleef het recessie-effect uit tot 2011. Bovendien was het effect beperkt. We zien nu in 2013 weer een stijging van de giften. Dit is opmerkelijk omdat de waarde van onroerend goed in 2013 nog daalde. Ook de betrokkenheid van bedrijven bij goede doelen blijft hoog, ondanks de crisis. Het totaalbedrag aan giften en sponsoring is vrijwel gelijk gebleven.

Ook het overheidsbeleid van de afgelopen jaren heeft voor terugslag gezorgd. De overheid heeft taken gedecentraliseerd naar gemeenten, waardoor een groter beroep wordt gedaan op burgers om voor henzelf en hun naasten te zorgen. In de nieuwe cijfers over vrijwilligerswerk zien we een achteruitgang. In 2010 deed nog 41% vrijwilligerswerk, in 2014 is dat gedaald naar 37%. Ook het aantal uren dat vrijwilligers actief zijn is gedaald, naar 18 uur per maand. In 2012 was dit nog 21 uur. We zien wel veerkracht onder de loyale groep vrijwilligers, die juist actiever is geworden. Er is echter een grens aan de inzet van de trouwe vrijwilliger. Het toenemende belang dat de overheid in de participatiesamenleving aan mantelzorg en informele hulp hecht vormt op termijn een bedreiging voor het vrijwilligerswerk. We zien in het Geven in Nederland onderzoek dat informele hulp, mantelzorg en vrijwilligerswerk communicerende vaten zijn. Het hemd is dan nader dan de rok. Mensen stoppen vaker met vrijwilligerswerk als ze mantelzorgtaken erbij krijgen.

De overheid heeft bezuinigd op subsidies voor specifieke goededoelenorganisaties. Met name in de cultuursector hebben instellingen lastige keuzes moeten maken. Door de bezuinigingen op culturele instellingen is een beroep gedaan op de veerkracht in de sector cultuur. We zien hier grote verschillen tussen instellingen. De grotere musea van ons land zijn met behoud van subsidie in staat geweest om ook nog meer geld uit de markt te halen. Voor veel andere instellingen staan de inkomsten door bezuinigingen onder druk en zij lijken nog niet goed in staat meer inkomsten uit fondsenwerving en commerciële inkomsten te halen. Helaas blijkt ook bij de gevers de veerkracht beperkt te zijn. Vooralsnog zijn de bezuinigingen op culturele instellingen veel groter dan de toename in de giften aan culturele instellingen. Vermogende gevers zijn niet van plan meer te gaan geven aan cultuur.

De komende jaren zal duidelijk worden of vrijwillige bijdragen voldoende zijn om de schokken op te vangen die de economische crisis en de bezuinigingen door de overheid hebben veroorzaakt.  Zijn we als samenleving in staat deze betrokkenheid te mobiliseren? De aantrekkingskracht van het werk van goededoelenorganisaties is daarbij niet voldoende. Vermogende particulieren verlangen een meer zakelijke manier van werken dan gebruikelijk is bij veel goede doelen en hebben behoefte aan nieuwe financiële instrumenten die zakelijke investeringen in de kwaliteit van de samenleving mogelijk maken. Denk daarbij aan crowdfunding, social impact bonds, en ‘venture philanthropy’. De lage rentestand maken deze alternatieve vormen van investeren aantrekkelijker. In de geest van het convenant uit 2011 zou de sector filantropie in overleg met de overheid en het bedrijfsleven deze instrumenten verder moeten ontwikkelen.

Literatuur

Bekkers, R., Schuyt, T.N.M. & Gouwenberg, B.M. (2015, Red). Geven in Nederland 2015: Giften, Nalatenschappen, Sponsoring en Vrijwilligerswerk. Amsterdam: Reed Business.

Harbaugh, W.T. , Mayr , U., & Burghart, D.R. (2007). Neural responses to taxation and voluntary giving reveal motives for charitable donations. Science, 316: 1622-1625.

Rockefeller Foundation (2015). Resilience. https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/our-work/topics/resilience/

Shorto, R. (2005). The Island At the Center of the World. New York: Random House/Vintage.

[*] Deze bijdrage is deels gebaseerd op gegevens uit Geven in Nederland 2015 (Bekkers, Schuyt & Gouwenberg, 2015).

1 Comment

Filed under altruism, Center for Philanthropic Studies, charitable organizations, economics, foundations, household giving, Netherlands, philanthropy, taxes, Uncategorized, volunteering

Giving in the Netherlands 2015: Summary of Principle Findings

This is a summary in English. Download this post in PDF here.

Prof. R.H.F.P. Bekkers, Ph.D., Prof. Th.N.M. Schuyt, Ph.D., & Gouwenberg, B.M. (Eds., 2015). Giving in the Netherlands: Donations, Bequests, Sponsoring and Volunteering. Amsterdam: Reed Business. ISBN 978 90 352 4818 2

I – Results for 2013

Total amount donated in 2013

In the Netherlands, about € 4.4 billion was donated to charitable causes in 2013.

The total figure is the sum of estimated contributions made in the course of the calendar year by households, bequests, foundations (both fundraising foundations and endowed foundations), businesses and lotteries. The amount is an underestimate because data on bequests and endowed foundations are known to be incomplete.

 In the Netherlands, approximately 0.7% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is donated to charitable causes (€ 643 billion in 2013)

This low percentage seems to contradict the general impression that the Dutch are generous givers. By comparison: In the United States, the percentage of the GDP given to charitable causes in the period 1965-2013 fluctuated around 2% (Giving USA, 2014). However, the Dutch contribute to public, social and charitable causes primarily by paying taxes, while Americans do so to a far lesser extent, given the considerably lower tax burden in the United States. Furthermore, in contrast to ‘Giving In the Netherlands’, ‘Giving USA’ does seem to have a clear image of contributions from bequests and endowed foundations.

Sources of contributions in 2013

Households (money and goods)  € 1,944 million 45%
Bequests  € 265 million 6%
Foundations: Fundraising foundationsEndowed foundations € 106 million€ 184 million 2%4%
Corporations (gifts and sponsoring) € 1,363 million 31%
Lotteries € 494 million 11%
Total € 4,356 million 100%

The figures for households and corporations are estimates based on representative samples and generalized to the entire population (n = 1,505 and n = 1,164, respectively). The figures relating to bequests and foundations (fundraising and endowed foundations) are based on archival records. Since these available archival records are far from complete, we do not make generalizations to the entire sector for bequests and foundations, resulting in an underestimation being based only on information available to us.

Figures on bequests are taken from the Central Bureau of Fundraising (CBF), to which national fundraising foundations submit financial statements regarding their received contributions. 196 of 584 CBF-registered fundraising foundations reported bequests. Far from all fundraising foundations report their income to the CBF, churches and nonprofit organizations such as hospitals, museums and educational institutions for example do not. Therefore, the total amount donated through bequests is likely to be much higher than reported.

The figures on fundraising foundations are derived from the CBF as well. In total, 516 fundraising foundations contributed €3,097 million to good causes in 2013. The contributions of fundraising foundations as mentioned in the table above (€106 million) consists only of ‘income from investments’. The remaining income – such as fundraising among the Dutch population, and the commercial sector – are only included in figures from the respective chapters (households, corporations) in order to prevent double counting.

An issue for concern in our analysis on endowed foundations is the lack of complete data on grant making by this group of interest. It remains unknown how many endowed foundations there are, what they contribute as a group and what their combined assets are. There are 810 endowed foundation registered with a national data archive on philanthropy called ‘Kennisbank Filantropie’, through which they were asked to fill out an online questionnaire. The figures are based on the resulting sample of 141 endowed foundations that took the time and effort to report about their contributions. However, these foundations constitute only a small proportion of the total number of charitable endowed foundations in de Netherlands, since many foundations operate anonymously.

Six national permanent and semi-permanent gambling and lottery license holders support charitable causes with part of their proceeds. Since 2004, de BankGiroloterij N.V., de VriendenLoterij N.V. (formerly Sponsor Bingo Loterij) and De Nationale Postcode Loterij N.V. are classified under the N.V. Holding Nationale Goede Doelen Loterijen. The other three license holders are Stichting de Nationale Sporttotalisator (De Lotto), Sportech B.V. and Samenwerkende Non-profit Loterijen (SNL). Figures used in Giving In the Netherlands were derived from the annual reports of these license holders.

 

Recipient organizations in 2013

million € Percentage
Religion 977 22
International aid 578 13
Sports and recreation 554 13
Public/social benefit 547 13
Health 535 12
Environment, nature en animals 356 8
Other (not specified) 321 7
Culture 281 6
Education and research 208 5
Totala 4,356 100%

a All figures are rounded off. This may lead to a discrepancy between the sum of the sub-categories and the total amount displayed.

 In 2013, the Dutch donated by far the highest amount to religion (€806 million). Education and research remains the smallest sector in terms of charitable contributions (5%).

 

Sources and recipient organizations in 2013

The total amount donated by households, individuals (bequests), both fundraising and endowed foundations, businesses/corporations and lotteries to public or social causes is subdivided as follows:

House-holds a Bequests Foundations b Corpo-rations a Lotteries Total %
(€x million) FF EF Total
Religion 787 6 2 4 6 177 977 22
Health 213 83 24 23 48 155 36 535 12
International aid 304 61 15 16 31 67 115 577 13
Environment/nature/ animals 150 42 20 6 26 47 91 356 8
Education/ research 41 1 1 17 18 148 208 5
Culture 57 3 26 52 79 80 63 281 6
Sports/recreation 42 0 0 11 11 433 68 554 13
Public and social benefit 190 70 17 45 62 139 86 547 13
Other (not specified) 160 0 0 9 9 117 35 321 7
Total 1,944 265 106 184 290 1,363 494 4,356 100

a The figures on households and corporations are based on generalizations. That is: The total amount of contributions made by households and corporations in the Netherlands are derived from amounts reported in a sample of the respective groups. For bequests and foundations this is not the case, since the necessary information  needed to make these estimations is missing.

b FF = fundraising foundations; EF = endowed foundations

  •  Households give the highest amount to religious organizations.
  • Bequests primarily benefit health.
  • Fundraising foundations give from their own resources (investments), particularly to health and international aid.
  • Culture is an important sector for endowed foundations.
  • Sports and recreation is the favored sector of choice by businesses and corporations.
  • The lotteries supporting good causes give most of their money to international aid and environment, nature and animals.

 

 

Volunteer work in 2013/2014

In 2014, 37% of the population had performed unpaid volunteering activities for an organization in the preceding year.
  • Sports associations and religious organizations attract the highest amount of volunteers.
  • Volunteers spent an average of 18 hours per month on their volunteer work.
  • Most volunteers perform managerial tasks (26%), do chores (20%), do office work and administration (18%), give advice and training (17%) or offer transportation (14%).
  • There is an increased likelihood of finding volunteers among the elderly, parents, the religious, those who attend church regularly and the higher educated. People with a full time employment and those living in one of the three largest Dutch cities volunteer less often.

II – Trends 1995-2013

Total amounts donated, 1995-2013 (Million €)a

1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013
2,279 2,164 3,426 3,614 4,925 4,379 4,562 4,708 4,255 4,356

a Due to applied corrections, figures differ slightly from previous editions of ‘Giving in the Netherlands’.

  • After a period with an upward trend starting in 2005, 2009 commenced a downward trend in total contributions to good causes. In 2013, we see total giving bounce back with a 2,3% increase compared to 2011.
  • It is important to note that trends should be interpreted with caution due to incomplete data on bequests and contributions of endowed foundations.

Giving as percentage of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) 1995-2013a

 

Billion €
1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013
GDP 324 363 413 476 506 541 609 617 643 643
Total giving 2,3 2,2 3,4 3,6 4,9 4,4 4,6 4,7 4,3 4,4
Donations % GDP 0,7 0,6 0,8 0,8 1,0 0,8 0,8 0,8 0,7 0,7

a Due to applied corrections, figures differ slightly from previous editions of ‘Giving in the Netherlands’.

  • As a percentage of the Gross Domestic Product, donations have hovered around 0.8% since 1995. From 2003 onwards there is a downward trend.
  • Again, trends should be interpreted with caution because of incomplete data on bequests and contributions of endowed foundations.

Sources of contributions 1995-2013 (in millions of €) a,b

Million €
1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013
Households 1,419 1,121 1,414 1,788 1,899 1,854 1,945 1,938 1,829 1,944
Corporations 610 693 1,466 1,359 2,271 1,513 1,639 1,694 1,378 1,363
Lotteries -,- -,- -,- -,- 369 396 394 461 498 494
Foundations 163 214 329 237 196 431 339 387 294 290
Bequests 87 135 213 231 189 182 240 232 256 265
Total 2,279 2,163 3,422 3,615 4,924 4,376 4,557 4,712 4,255 4,356

a Due to applied corrections to the figures on households, corporations, lotteries, foundations and bequests, figures differ slightly from previous editions of ‘Giving in the Netherlands’.

b The figures on households and corporations are based on generalized numbers. That is: The total amount of contributions made by households and corporations in the Netherlands are derived from amounts reported in a sample of the respective groups. For bequests and foundations, this is not the case, since the necessary information  needed to make these estimations is missing.

Households

  • In 2013, Households donated a total of €1,944 million in money and goods. This amount exceeds that of 2011 (€1,829 million) with 6%. Adjusted for inflation, the value of gifts and goods donated by households has increased with 1,2% since 2011. Household giving represents 0.3% of GDP and 0,67% of household consumption expenditure in  2013

Bequests

  • The amount of income from bequests as reported by fundraising foundations in their financial statements has risen sharply since 1995.

Foundations

  • The figures are based on the sum of contributions from equity earnings of a non-representative group of endowed foundations (n=141) and the contributions from 448 fundraising foundations. It is difficult to make definitive statements about trends on contributions by foundations because the data concern only a small group of endowed foundations and the figures for the years 1995-2013 are calculated in different ways.

Corporations

  • The figures on contributions by corporations through sponsoring and gifts resemble those of 2011. According to our estimations, we see a slight decrease in sponsoring and a slight increase in making gifts, compared to 2011. In 2011, we reported a decline of contributions by corporations compared to 2009. In 2013 however, this decline seems to have halted. Contributions from corporations remain an important source of income for the different sectors.

 

Lotteries

  • Charitable contributions by lotteries have seen a strong increase in recent years. We do see a minor decline of contributions in 2013 compared to 2011, mainly caused by a decrease in contributions from the Lotto.

 

Recipient sectors 1995-2013

Trends in contributions to the different recipient sectors in terms of total amounts (in € million) and relative ranking (1-8)a,b

1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013
Religion 587 (1) 511 (1) 490 (4) 750 (1) 938 (1) 772 (1) 1,001 (1) 892 (1) 806 (1) 977 (1)
Health 411 (2) 290 (4) 640 (1) 398 (4) 580 (4) 467 (5) 468 (5) 629 (3) 471 (5) 535 (5)
International aid 361 (3) 299 (3) 542 (3) 531 (3) 480 (6) 756 (2) 561 (4) 576 (4) 564 (3) 578 (2)
Environment/ nature/animals 204 (6) 183 (6) 309 (6) 251 (7) 309 (7) 356 (6) 376 (7) 438 (7) 378 (6) 356 (6)
Education/ research
58 (8) 83 (8) 232 (7) 125 (-) 301 (8) 277 (8) 295 (8) 285 (8) 150 (8) 208 (8)
Culture 83 (7) 87 (7) 165 (8) 335 (6) 610 (3) 326 (7) 386 (6) 453 (6) 293 (7) 281 (7)
Sports/recreation 246 (5) 410 (2) 579 (2) 686 (2) 930 (2) 686 (3) 687 (3) 715 (2) 702 (2) 554 (3)
Public and social benefit 283 (4) 257 (5) 422 (5) 373 (5) 554 (5) 519 (4) 572 (2) 469 (5) 538 (4) 547 (4)
Other (not specified) 46 (-) 44 (-) 47 (-) 158 (8) 223 (-) 220 (-) 216 (-) 251(-) 349 (-) 321 (-)
Total* 2,279 2,164 3,426 3,614 4,925 4,379 4,562 4,708 4,251 4,356

a Due to differences in rounding off, the total amounts can deviate slightly from the total amounts given in the previous table.

b Due to applied corrections to the figures on households, corporations, lotteries, foundations and bequests, figures differ slightly from previous editions of ‘Giving in the Netherlands’.

Ranking of recipient sectors, averaged over the period 1995 – 2013
1. Religion
2. Sports and recreation
3. International aid
4. Health
5. Public and social benefit
6. Environment, nature and animals
7. Culture
8. Education and research

Over the 18 year period, religion receives the highest contribution and education and research receive the lowest contributions.

Volunteer work 2002-2014

2002

2004

2006

2008

2010*

2012*

2014*

Volunteer work

46%

41%

42%

45%

41%

38%

37%

* Estimates include non-native Dutch citizens.

  • The declining trend in volunteering rates we reported in the previous ‘Giving in the Netherlands’ books seems to have persisted in 2014.
  • In the past two years, the average hours a volunteer spends volunteering per month decreased slightly, from 21 to 18 hours.
  • During the past years, volunteers seems to have specialized by dedicating themselves to a smaller number of tasks. The share of volunteers that is working on three or more tasks declined from about a half of all volunteers in 2002 to about a quarter of all volunteers in 2014.
  • The dynamics in volunteering seems to have worn off a little. In the past two years, less people started volunteering. Those that do start volunteering tend to spend significantly less time on volunteering than the loyal, continuous volunteers. There seems to be a positive relationship between continuous volunteering and experienced social pressure. Those who perceive stronger social pressure tend to be the more persistent volunteers and remain more loyal to the organization they volunteer for.

III – Highlights

Households/individuals
  • A total of 1,505 households were surveyed in the 2012 wave of the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey (GINPS). 1,320 of the respondents also participated in the GINPS 2010 wave.
  • The average amount donated in money and in kind by Dutch households in the calendar year 2013 was €204, virtually identical to that of 2011. In 2013, 88% of Dutch households gives to charitable organizations with an average of €232 over the entire calendar year. 47% gives in kind, with an average value of €113. While we see an increasing popularity of giving money and goods to charitable causes, the average amount these households contribute seems to decrease.
  • Households most often give to health (74%), followed by environment, nature and animals (44%) and international aid (41%). While less than a third of Dutch households (29%) give to religion, it receives the highest amount. Donations to religion represent 43% of the total amount donated by Dutch households. Organizations which provide international aid and health organizations receive 12% and 13% of the total amount of household gifts, respectively.
  • Although the traditional door-to-door collection remains the most popular way to donate money in the Netherlands, its popularity decreased. While in 2005 90% of households donated to a door-to-door collection, in 2013 this declined to 78%. Many other ways to donate also decreased in popularity since 2011. New forms of giving such as giving through text messaging or via the internet barely gained popularity during the past years.
  • Similar to the previous ‘Giving in the Netherlands’ edition, we find that giving behavior of Dutch households follows the 80/20 rule: 20% of the households is responsible for 80% of the total amount donated. There are large differences in giving behaviors between households. 12% percent of Dutch households does not donate to charitable causes and over a quarter of the households (26%) donated less than €25 in 2013. At the other end of the spectrum, one in every seventy (1,5%) Dutch give more than €2000. This group accounts for over a quarter (27%) of the total amount of charitable contributions in the Netherlands. A substantial proportion of these large donations comes from the wealthy Dutch.
  • Differences between households in giving behavior are associated with socioeconomic characteristics such as age (older people donate more), education (higher educated donate more), income and wealth (the more financial resources, the higher the donated amounts) and religion (religious Dutch, especially Protestants, donate more). Households seem to do more charitable giving as they hold more altruistic values and as the frequency with which they are asked for donations increases.
  • Although total charitable giving appears to be relatively stable across time, we find an interesting dynamic underlying the surface. Many households remain loyal donors to organizations operating in health, while the other sectors are comprised out of more incidental than loyal donors.
Giving by Corporations
  • In 2013, 70% of the corporations gave money by donating directly or sponsoring activities organized by nonprofit organizations. This percentage is similar to that of two years ago, when 71% of corporations donated directly or sponsored activities organized by nonprofit organizations. According to our estimations, the relative proportion of sponsoring decreased and the proportion of corporations giving increased, compared to 2011. However, we do not see a further decline as seen in 2011 compared to 2009. Corporations remain an important source for charitable contributions in the array of sectors.
  • Sports and recreation is the most popular sector for sponsoring and gift making among corporations. Simultaneously, we find that in absolute terms, sports and recreation received less money than previous years and the breadth of the support for this sector in our sample also decreased. The percentage of corporations that give to or sponsor activities in sports and recreation is lower than previous editions of ‘Giving in the Netherlands’
  • It seems that corporations do not utilize philanthropy strategically. A vast majority of the corporations does not have a specific giving policy, and only a small group of corporations communicates about their philanthropic activities to internal or external parties. Corporations that do utilize a charitable giving policy strategy operate more ‘strategically’: they communicate more often, but also tend to give higher amounts to charitable causes.
  • Corporations that sponsor and/or give mostly do so to a limited number of sectors.
  • Sponsoring and donating man hours remains an important way of giving by corporations in 2013 and seems to have steadily gained in popularity over the past years. Corporations thus explicitly aim to promote their employees’ active participation in societal projects.
  • Although corporations seem to be increasingly aware of the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR), we do not see an increase in corporations engaging in CSR. Many corporations have initiated new CSR initiatives, but these do not seem to displace sponsoring or gift making.


Specials

 

The multiplier in the ‘Geefwet’ and giving to culture

Giving in the Netherlands 2015 contains one ‘special’. Since January 2012, gifts to cultural nonprofit organizations are 125% tax deductible, instead of the 100% deductibility of gifts to nonprofit organizations in other sectors. The Dutch government seeks to encourage donations to cultural nonprofits. In this chapter, we report on changes in the charity law (the ‘Geefwet’) and changes in giving to cultural nonprofit organizations.

  • Government cut backs on the cultural sector have necessitated a diversification of income sources for cultural nonprofit organizations.
  • It is too early to assess the effect of the tax law reform with sufficient accuracy.
  • Of all households, 11% gave to cultural nonprofit organizations, similar to 2011.
  • Wealthy Dutch households give more often (36%) to cultural nonprofit organizations than the average households do (11%), and also gives more (median gift of €100, compared to €8).
  • The proportion of wealthy households planning to give more to cultural nonprofit organizations the next year is lower than the proportion of wealthy households intending to give more.
  • The multiplier may be able to increase giving to cultural organizations. Among wealthy households that give to cultural nonprofit organizations, awareness of the multiplier is positively related to the intention to give more. About half of wealthy households do not know how the multiplier works. Raising awareness about the multiplier among donors could therefore increase the number and size of gifts to cultural nonprofit organizations.

 

References

Giving USA 2014. The annual report on philanthropy for the year 2013. Indianapolis: Indiana  University, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

Schuyt, Th.N.M. (Ed.), (2001). Geven in Nederland 2011: giften, legaten, sponsoring en vrijwilligerswerk. Houten/Diegem: Bohn Stafleu Van Loghum.

‘Giving in the Netherlands’ is published biennially by the Center for Philanthropic Studies at VU University Amsterdam.

Email: gin.fsw@vu.nl or visit www.giving.nl

[1] In contrast to donation behavior, volunteer work has been measured for the years 2013/2014. In June 2014, respondents were asked if they had performed volunteer work in the previous 12 months.

[2] Contrary to charitable contributions, volunteering was measure biyearly in years 2002, 2004, 2006, 1008, 2012 and 2014. In the month May of 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012 and 2014, respondents were asked whether they volunteered or performed unpaid work in the past 12 months.

Leave a comment

Filed under Center for Philanthropic Studies, data, foundations, household giving, philanthropy

Valkuilen in het nieuwe systeem van toezicht op goededoelenorganisaties

Deze bijdrage verscheen op 27 januari op Filanthropium.nl.
Dank aan Theo Schuyt voor commentaar op een eerdere versie van dit stuk en aan Sigrid Hemels en Frans Nijhof voor correcties van enkele feitelijke onjuistheden. PDF? Klik hier.

De contouren van het toezicht op goededoelenorganisaties in de toekomst worden zo langzamerhand duidelijk. Het nieuwe systeem is een compromis dat op termijn veel kan veranderen, maar net zo goed een faliekante mislukking kan worden.

Hoe ziet het nieuwe systeem eruit?
In opdracht van de Minister van Veiligheid en Justitie heeft de Commissie De Jong een voorstel gedaan voor een nieuw systeem. De commissie stelt voor een Autoriteit Filantropie op te richten die de fondsenwervende goededoelenorganisaties moet registreren. De autoriteit is een nieuw orgaan dat onder het ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie valt, maar eigen wettelijke bevoegdheden krijgt. Burgers kunnen de registratie online raadplegen. Het uitgangspunt van het nieuwe systeem is een kostenbesparing. Geregistreerde goededoelenorganisaties hoeven geen keurmerk meer aan te vragen en krijgen automatisch toegang tot de markt voor fondsenwerving. Organisaties die geen fondsen werven zoals vermogensfondsen en organisaties die alleen onder hun leden fondsen werven zoals kerken hoeven zich niet te registreren. De autoriteit maakt de huidige registratie van Algemeen Nut Beogende Instellingen (ANBI’s) door de belastingdienst grotendeels overbodig.

Winnaars en verliezers
Het nieuwe systeem is een overwinning voor vijf partijen: de vermogensfondsen, de kerken, de bekende goededoelenorganisaties, het Ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie, en de Belastingdienst. De meeste vermogensfondsen en de kerken winnen in het nieuwe systeem omdat zij niet door de registratie heen hoeven wanneer zij geen fondsen werven onder het publiek. Zij blijven als ANBI’s geclassicificeerd bij de belastingdienst. De bekende goededoelenorganisaties winnen in het systeem omdat zij invloed krijgen op de criteria die voor registratie zullen gaan gelden. Het Ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie wint omdat zij volledige controle krijgt over goededoelenorganisaties. De Belastingdienst wint omdat zij afscheid kan nemen van een groot aantal werknemers die voor de registratie van goededoelenorganisaties zorgden.

De verliezers in het nieuwe systeem zijn de huidige toezichthouders op goededoelenorganisaties (waaronder het Centraal Bureau Fondsenwerving , CBF) en de kleinere goededoelenorganisaties. Het CBF verliest klanten omdat de nieuwe registratie gaat gelden als toegangsbewijs voor de Nederlandse markt voor fondsenwerving en daarmee het keurmerk van het CBF (en een aantal andere, minder bekende, keurmerken) overbodig maakt. De autoriteit filantropie krijgt de mogelijkheid overtreders te beboeten. De Belastingdienst heeft deze mogelijkheid in het huidige systeem niet, zij kan alleen de ANBI-status intrekken. Ook het CBF kan geen boetes innen, maar alleen het keurmerk intrekken.

De criteria waarop potentiële gevers goededoelenorganisaties kunnen gaan beoordelen zijn nog niet geformuleerd. Omdat de kleinere goededoelenorganisaties in Nederland niet of niet goed georganiseerd zijn is het lastig om hun belangen in de autoriteit filantropie een stem te geven. Het gevaar dreigt dat de grotere goededoelenorganisaties de overhand krijgen in de discussie over de regels. Ook is onduidelijk hoe streng de controle gaat worden. De belastingdienst gaat deze controle in ieder geval niet meer doen. De commissie stelt voor dat vooral voorafgaand aan de registratie controle plaatsvindt.

De winst- en verliesrekening voor de burger – als potentiële gever en belastingbetaler – is minder duidelijk. De kosten van de hele operatie zijn niet berekend. De commissie stelt voor dat alle organisaties die zich registreren om toegang te krijgen tot de Nederlandse markt voor fondsenwerving mee gaan betalen. Het ANBI-register telt momenteel zo’n 60.000 inschrijvingen; een deel betreft organisaties die zich in het nieuwe systeem niet meer hoeven te registreren (kerken, vermogensfondsen). Als er 20.000 registraties overblijven kan het nieuwe systeem voor de goededoelenorganisaties aanmerkelijk goedkoper worden. Op dit moment betalen 269 landelijk wervende goededoelenorganisaties voor het CBF-keurmerk. In het huidige systeem worden alle keurmerkhouders gecontroleerd. De autoriteit zal slechts steekproefsgewijs en bij klachten controles uitvoeren.

Gebrekkige probleemanalyse
Het advies vertrekt vanuit de probleemanalyse dat het vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties daalt door schandalen en affaires. Deze analyse is niet goed onderbouwd. De publieke verontwaardiging over de salariëring van (interim)managers zoals bij Plan Nederland en de Hartstichting in 2004 en het breken van (onmogelijke) beloften over gratis fondsenwerving zoals bij Alpe D’huZes vorig jaar bedreigen vooral de inkomsten van getroffen organisaties, niet de giften aan de goededoelensector als geheel. Het vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties daalt al tijden structureel, zo blijkt uit het Geven in Nederland onderzoek van de Vrije Universiteit en de peilingen van het Nederlands Donateurs Panel.

Vervolgens stelt het advies dat het doel van een nieuw systeem is om het vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties onder burgers te vergroten. Dat burgers in vertrouwen moeten kunnen geven door het nieuwe systeem lijkt een legitiem doel. Het is echter de vraag of overheid de imago- en communicatieproblemen van de goededoelensector op moet lossen. We zouden de sector daar immers ook zelf verantwoordelijk voor kunnen houden, zoals in de Verenigde Staten gebeurt. Voor het imago van de overheid en het vertrouwen in de politiek is het echter verstandig de controle op organisaties die fiscale voordelen krijgen waterdicht te maken, zodat er geen vragen komen over de doelmatigheid van de besteding van belastinggeld. Daarnaast is het vanuit de politieke keuze voor de participatiesamenleving verstandig meer inzicht te vragen in de prestaties van goededoelenorganisaties. Als burgers zelf meer verantwoordelijkheid krijgen voor het publiek welzijn via goededoelenorganisaties willen we wel kunnen zien of zij die verantwoordelijkheid inderdaad waarmaken. Dat zou via het register van de Autoriteit Filantropie kunnen.

Nieuw systeem zorgt niet automatisch voor meer vertrouwen
Het is echter de vraag of de burger door het nieuwe systeem ook inderdaad weer meer vertrouwen krijgt in goededoelenorganisaties. Het advies van de Commissie de Jong heeft veel details van het nieuwe systeem nog niet ingevuld. Vertrouwen drijft op de betrouwbaarheid van de controlerende instantie. Die organisatie moet onafhankelijk én streng zijn. Conflicterende belangen bedreigen het vertrouwen. Als de te controleren organisaties vertegenwoordigd zijn in de autoriteit of haar activiteiten kunnen beïnvloeden is zij niet onafhankelijk. Een gebrek aan controle is eveneens een risicofactor voor het publieksvertrouwen, vooral als er later problemen blijken te zijn. Het is belangrijk dat de autoriteit proactief handelt en niet slechts achteraf na gebleken onregelmatigheden een onderzoek instelt.

Blijkbaar is er iets mis met de huidige controle. De probleemanalyse van de commissie de Jong gaat ook op dit punt kort door de bocht. Het advies omschrijft niet hoe de controle op goededoelenorganisaties op dit moment plaatsvindt. De commissie analyseert evenmin wat de problemen zijn in het huidige systeem. Op dit moment gebeurt de controle op goededoelenorganisaties niet door de overheid. De belastingdienst registreert ‘Algemeen nut beogende instellingen’ (ANBI’s), maar controleert deze instellingen nauwelijks als ze eenmaal geregistreerd zijn.

Sterke en zwakke punten van het huidige systeem
In feite heeft de overheid de controle op goededoelenorganisaties nu uitbesteed aan een vrije markt van toezichthouders. Dit zijn organisaties zoals het CBF die keurmerken verstrekken. In theorie is dit een goed werkend systeem omdat de vrijwillige deelname een signaal van kwaliteit geeft aan potentiële donateurs. Goededoelenorganisaties kunnen ervoor kiezen om aan eisen te voldoen die aan deze keurmerken zijn verbonden. Organisaties die daarvoor kiezen willen en kunnen openheid geven; de organisaties die dat niet doen laden de verdenking op zich dat zij minder betrouwbaar zijn. Het systeem werkt als de toezichthouder onafhankelijk is, de controle streng, en de communicatie daarover effectief. Het CBF heeft in de afgelopen jaren echter verzuimd om de criteria scherp te hanteren en uit te leggen aan potentiële donateurs. Het CBF-Keur stelt bijvoorbeeld geen maximum aan de salarissen van medewerkers. Ook bij de onafhankelijkheid kunnen vragen worden gesteld. De grote goededoelenorganisaties zijn met twee afgevaardigden van de VFI vertegenwoordigd in het CBF, en zijn daarnaast in feite klanten die betalen voor de kosten van het systeem. Zij hebben er belang bij de eisen niet aan te scherpen omdat dan de kosten te hoog oplopen.

Twee valkuilen
In het nieuwe systeem dreigen zowel de onafhankelijkheid als de pakkans voor problemen te zorgen. De commissie laat het aan de autoriteit over om te bepalen welke regels zullen worden gehanteerd. Maar wie komen er in die autoriteit? De commissie beveelt aan ‘diverse belanghebbenden (sector, wetenschap, overheid)’ in het bestuur van de autoriteit te laten vertegenwoordigen. Het is echter onduidelijk welke partijen er in de autoriteit precies zitting krijgen, en in welke machtsverhoudingen. Wel is duidelijk dat de autoriteit in eerste instantie uitgaat van het zelfregulerend vermogen van de sector. De goededoelenorganisaties mogen dus zelf met voorstellen komen voor de regels. De commissie legt de verantwoordelijkheid voor de vaststelling van de regels vervolgens bij de overheid, en meer in het bijzonder bij de Minister van Veiligheid en Justitie. Het is dan de vraag in hoeverre de minister gevoelig is voor de lobby van goededoelenorganisaties.

De commissie stelt ook voor de controle op grond van risicoanalyses uit te voeren en om af te gaan op klachten. Dat kan in de praktijk voldoende blijken te zijn. Het nieuwe systeem neemt echter als uitgangspunt de kosten te minimaliseren. Deze kosten moeten bovendien door de te controleren goededoelenorganisaties worden opgebracht. Zij krijgen er belang bij de controle licht en oppervlakkig mogelijk te maken. Als er onvoldoende controle plaatsvindt, zoals in de Verenigde Staten het geval is, zullen ook geregistreerde organisaties onbetrouwbaar blijken te zijn. Dit is natuurlijk helemaal desastreus voor het vertrouwen.

De commissie de Jong stelt bovendien voor dat alle fondsenwervende goededoelenorganisaties van enige betekenisvolle omvang verplicht geregistreerd worden. Het nieuwe systeem biedt geen zicht op de prestaties van vermogensfondsen en kerken omdat zij onder de belastingdienst blijven vallen. Zij krijgen een voorkeursbehandeling omdat zij geen fondsen werven, of alleen onder leden. Dit is een oneigenlijk argument. Het criterium van algemeen nut betreft niet de herkomst van de fondsen, maar de prestaties. Ook de activiteiten van kerken en vermogensfondsen moeten ten goede komen aan het algemeen nut.

Het middel van verplichte registratie is waarschijnlijk niet effectief in het vergroten van het publieksvertrouwen. Een verplichte registratie heeft geen signaalfunctie voor potentiële donateurs. Als alle goededoelenorganisaties aan de eisen voldoen, zijn ze dan allemaal even betrouwbaar? Dat is niet erg waarschijnlijk. Ofwel de lat wordt in het nieuwe systeem zo laag gelegd dat alle organisaties er overheen kunnen springen, ofwel de lat wordt op papier weliswaar hoog gelegd maar in de praktijk stelt de controle niets voor.

Het zou veel beter zijn de autoriteit een vrijwillig sterrensysteem te laten ontwerpen waarin donateurs kunnen zien hoe professioneel de organisatie is aan het aantal sterren die onafhankelijke controle heeft opgeleverd. Donateurs kunnen dan professionelere organisaties verkiezen, voor zover ze bereid zijn daarvoor te betalen tenminste. Geld werven kost geld, en geld effectief besteden ook. Met een financiële bijsluiter kan de autoriteit filantropie inzichtelijk maken wat de te verwachten risico’s zijn van private investeringen in goededoelenorganisaties. Zo dwingt de markt de goededoelenorganisaties tot concurrentie op prestaties voor het publiek welzijn. Een waarlijk onafhankelijke autoriteit die scherp controleert op naleving van (naar keuze) strenge of minder strenge regels is ook binnen die contouren mogelijk en lijkt mij gezien de maatschappelijke betekenis van de filantropie in Nederland van belang.

2 Comments

Filed under charitable organizations, corporate social responsibility, foundations, fraud, household giving, incentives, law, philanthropy, policy evaluation, politics, taxes, trends, trust

Tien Filantropie Trends

  1. Nalatenschappen: goededoelenorganisaties ontvangen steeds meer inkomsten uit nalatenschappen, naar verwachting €86 miljard tot 2059.
  2. Evenementen: goededoelenorganisaties ontvangen steeds meer inkomsten uit evenementen zoals Alpe d’Huzes waar enthousiaste vrijwilligers sponsorgelden voor werven.
  3. Werknemersvrijwilligerswerk: bedrijven sponsoren steeds minder direct met geld, en sturen hun medewerkers liever op maatschappelijk verantwoord teamuitje zoals NL Doet.
  4. Vertrouwen onder druk: het traditioneel hoge niveau van vertrouwen in goededoelenorganisaties daalt structureel en lijdt incidenteel verlies door ophef over salarissen.
  5. Lokalisering: lokale nonprofit organisaties zoals musea en ziekenhuizen gaan fondsenwerven, internationale hulporganisaties ontvangen steeds minder.
  6. Dynamiek in geefgedrag: donateurs zijn steeds minder trouw aan goededoelenorganisaties en doen vaker incidentele giften zoals bij sponsoracties.
  7. Druk op het waterbed: de overheid bezuinigt en probeert burgers meer bij te laten bijdragen, onder meer door fiscale maatregelen zoals de Geefwet.
  8. Meer transparantie:  goededoelenorganisaties in het ANBI-register worden per 1 januari 2014 verplicht openheid te geven over hun financiën en beleid.
  9. Doe-het-zelf filantropie met crowdfunding: steeds vaker werven mensen geld voor hun eigen goede doel via sociale media en geefplatforms zoals Voordekunst.nl
  10. Mega-donors: terwijl de giften van het mediane huishouden afnemen, geven vermogende Nederlanders steeds meer.

1 Comment

Filed under charitable organizations, corporate social responsibility, crowdfunding, foundations, household giving, law, politics, taxes, trends, volunteering, wealth

Dag van de Filantropie en Boekpresentatie Geven in Nederland 2013 op 25 april

Op de Dag van de Filantropie 2013 – het jaarlijks terugkerend evenement op de laatste donderdag van april – is dit jaar het boek ‘Geven in Nederland 2013’ gepresenteerd. Dit jaar kreeg een bijzonder tintje door het aanvaarden van een bijzondere leerstoel met het uitspreken van de rede ‘De maatschappelijke betekenis van filantropie’ door René Bekkers.

Kiezen om te Delen: Filantropie in Tijden van Economische Tegenwind

Nu het economisch niet voor de wind gaat zien we allerlei verschuivingen in de filantropie in Nederland. We zien een  terugval in het geefgedrag en verschuivingen in bestedingen van bedrijven en huishoudens. Zij moeten bewustere keuzes maken; onderscheid maken tussen wat écht belangrijk is en wat niet. De dynamiek binnen de bronnen van filantropische bijdragen en maatschappelijke doelen vormden het hoofdthema van het symposium. De presentatie van het onderzoek naar geefgedrag door huishoudens en vermogende Nederlanders vindt u hier. De resultaten van het onderzoek naar bedrijven, sociale normen rond filantropie en de trends in de cijfers van de bijdragen van huishoudens, bedrijven, en loterijen vindt u later op de Geven in Nederland website.

De Maatschappelijke Betekenis van Filantropie

De groeiende aandacht voor filantropie wordt meestal verklaard uit het feit dat de overheid moet bezuinigingen. Men vergeet echter dat de sector filantropie zich vanaf begin jaren ‘90 in rap tempo heeft ontwikkeld. Het “Geven in Nederland”onderzoek maakt deel uit van deze ontwikkeling. Van bezuinigingen was in die periode geen sprake, eerder het tegendeel. Particulier initiatief liet weer van zich horen. Met het sluiten van het Convenant “Ruimte voor Geven” in juni 2011 tussen het kabinet en de sector filantropie is een nieuwe situatie ontstaan, waarin filantropie de ruimte krijgt om meer maatschappelijke betekenis te krijgen.

Wat is de maatschappelijke betekenis van filantropie? Die vraag beantwoordt René Bekkers in zijn oratie. Bekkers is per 1 januari 2013 aan de Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen van de Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam aangesteld als bijzonder hoogleraar Sociale aspecten van prosociaal gedrag. De leerstoel is mede mogelijk gemaakt door de Van der Gaag Stichting van de Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen (KNAW) voor een periode van vijf jaar. Bekkers gaat in op de herkomst en bestemming van filantropie in de samenleving. Waarom zien we meer filantropie in sommige sociale groepen, landen en perioden dan in andere? In welke sociale omstandigheden doen mensen vrijwilligerswerk en geven ze geld aan goededoelenorganisaties? In welke mate en in welke omstandigheden zullen Nederlanders overheidsbezuinigingen op kunst en cultuur, internationale hulp en andere doelen compenseren?

De volledige tekst van de oratie vindt u hier.

Leave a comment

Filed under altruism, charitable organizations, corporate social responsibility, empathy, foundations, helping, household giving, law, methodology, philanthropy, principle of care, taxes, trust