Category Archives: economics

Cut the crap, fund the research

We all spend way too much time preparing applications for research grants. This is a collective waste of time. For the 2019 vici grant scheme of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) in which I recently participated, 87% of all applicants received no grant. Based on my own experiences, I made a conservative calculation (here is the excel file so you can check it yourself) of the total costs for all people involved. The costs total €18.7 million. Imagine how much research time that is worth!

Cost

Applicants account for the bulk of the costs. Taken together, all applicants invested €15.8 million euro in the grant competition. As an applicant, I read the call for proposals, first considered whether or not I would apply, decided yes, I read the guidelines for applications, discussed ideas with colleagues, read the literature, wrote a short draft of the proposal to invite research partners, then wrote the proposal text, formatted the application according to the guidelines, prepared a budget for approval, collected some new data and analyzed it, considered whether ethics review was necessary, created a data management plan, corresponded with: grants advisors, a budget controller, HR advisors, internal reviewers, my head of department, the dean, a coach, and with societal partners. I revised the application, revised the budget, and submitted the preproposal. I waited. And waited. Then I read the preproposal evaluation by the committee members, and wrote responses to the preproposal evaluation. I revised my draft application again, and submitted the full application. I waited. And waited. I read the external reviews, wrote responses to their comments, and submitted a rebuttal. I waited. And waited. Then I prepared a 5 minutes pitch for the interview by the committee, responded to questions, and waited. Imagine I would have spent all that time on actual research. Each applicant could have spent 971 hours on research instead.

Also the university support system spends a lot of resources preparing budgets, internal reviews, and training of candidates. I involved research partners and societal partners to support the proposal. I feel bad for wasting their time as well.

The procedure also puts a burden on external reviewers. At a conference I attended, one of the reviewers of my application identified herself and asked me what had happened with the review she had provided. She had not heard back from the grant agency. I told her that she was not the only one who had given an A+ evaluation, but that NWO had overruled it in its procedures.

For the entire vici competition, an amount of €46.5 million was available, for 32 grants to be awarded. The amount wasted is 40% of that amount! That is unacceptable.

It is time to stop wasting our time.

 

Note: In a previous version of this post, I assumed that the number of applicants was 100. This estimate was much too low. The grant competition website says that across all domains 242 proposals were submitted. I revised the cost calculation (v2) to reflect the actual number of applicants. Note that this calculation leaves out hours spent by researchers who eventually decided not to submit a (pre-)proposal. The calculation further assumes that 180 full proposals were submitted and 105 candidates were interviewed.

Update, February 26: In the previous the cost of the procedure for NWO was severely underestimated. According to the annual report of NWO, the total salary costs for its staff that handles grant applications is €72 million per year. In the revised cost calculation, I’m assuming staff spend 218 hours for the entire vici competition. This amount consists of €198k variable costs (checking applications, inviting reviewers, composing decision letters, informing applicants, informing reviewers, handling appeals by 10% of full proposals, and handling ‘WOB verzoeken’ = Freedom Of Information Act requests) and €20k fixed costs: preparing the call for proposals, organizing committee meetings to discuss applications and their evaluations, attending committee meetings, reporting on committee meetings, evaluating the procedure).

Leave a comment

Filed under academic misconduct, economics, incentives, policy evaluation, taxes, time use

Revolutionizing Philanthropy Research Webinar

January 30, 11am-12pm (EST) / 5-6pm (CET) / 9-10pm (IST)

Why do people give to the benefit of others – or keep their resources to themselves? What is the core evidence on giving that holds across cultures? How does giving vary between cultures? How has the field of research on giving changed in the past decades?

10 years after the publication of “A Literature Review of Empirical Studies of Philanthropy: Eight Mechanisms that Drive Charitable Giving” in Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, it is time for an even more comprehensive effort to review the evidence base on giving. We envision an ambitious approach, using the most innovative tools and data science algorithms available to visualize the structure of research networks, identify theoretical foundations and provide a critical assessment of previous research.

We are inviting you to join this exciting endeavor in an open, global, cross-disciplinary collaboration. All expertise is very much welcome – from any discipline, country, or methodology. The webinar consists of four parts:

  1. Welcome: by moderator Pamala Wiepking, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and VU Amsterdam;
  2. The strategy for collecting research evidence on giving from publications: by Ji Ma, University of Texas;
  3. Tools we plan to use for the analyses: by René Bekkers, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam;
  4. The project structure, and opportunities to participate: by Pamala Wiepking.

The webinar is interactive. You can provide comments and feedback during each presentation. After each presentation, the moderator selects key questions for discussion.

We ask you to please register for the webinar here: https://iu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_faEQe2UtQAq3JldcokFU3g.

Registration is free. After you register, you will receive an automated message that includes a URL for the webinar, as well as international calling numbers. In addition, a recording of the webinar will be available soon after on the Open Science Framework Project page: https://osf.io/46e8x/

Please feel free to share with everyone who may be interested, and do let us know if you have any questions or suggestions at this stage.

We look forward to hopefully seeing you on January 30!

You can register at https://iu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_faEQe2UtQAq3JldcokFU3g

René Bekkers, Ji Ma, Pamala Wiepking, Arjen de Wit, and Sasha Zarins

1 Comment

Filed under altruism, bequests, charitable organizations, crowdfunding, economics, experiments, fundraising, helping, household giving, informal giving, open science, philanthropy, psychology, remittances, sociology, survey research, taxes, volunteering

Grootste goededoelenorganisaties ontvangen minder uit giften

Het ‘sectoronderzoek’ van Goede Doelen Nederland onder de 24 grootste goede doelen organisaties is weer verschenen. https://www.goededoelennederland.nl/system/files/public/Sector/190726%20Overzicht%20cijfers%20grote%20goede%20doelen%20met%20meer%20dan%2020%20miljoen.pdf

In het persbericht is onder de optimistische kop “Maatschappelijke betrokkenheid bij goede doelen onveranderd groot” te lezen dat “dat de resultaten in 2018 nagenoeg hetzelfde zijn als in 2017”. Ik zie iets anders. Drie tekenen aan de wand:

  1. De vrijgevigheid in Nederland neemt af. In 2018 ontvingen de grootste goede doelen in Nederland €571,6 miljoen, uit giften van particulieren en bedrijven. In 2017 was dit nog €583,6 miljoen. Een afname van 2%. De afname van giften van particulieren was bijna 4%. Tegelijk was de inflatie in Nederland 1,7%. De ontvangen euro’s zijn dus ook nog minder waard geworden.
  2. Een toename in inkomsten uit overheidssubsidie (goed voor 35% van de inkomsten van deze goede doelen), nalatenschappen (goed voor 12% van de inkomsten) en de goede doelen loterijen (nu 10% van de inkomsten) hebben de daling van de vrijgevigheid van particulieren en bedrijven opgevangen, maar niet goed gemaakt.
  3. De grootste goede doelen in Nederland besteden exact nul euro (= €0) aan opleidingen.

Update, 26 september 2019: ook de Volkskrant heeft de jaarverslagen van de grootste goededoelenorganisaties geanalyseerd en komt tot vergelijkbare conclusies. Zie hier het hoofdartikel dat op de voorpagina stond en hier het achtergrondartikel. Navraag bij het CBF leert dat de nul euro besteed aan opleidingen geen betrekking heeft op opleidingen van medewerkers, maar opleidingen van doelgroepen; de grootste goededoelenorganisaties zijn dus niet actief op het terrein van onderwijs.

Leave a comment

Filed under bequests, charitable organizations, data, economics, fundraising, household giving, Netherlands, trends

Global Giving: Open Grant Proposal

Here’s an unusual thing for you to read: I am posting a brief description of a grant proposal that I will submit for the ‘vici’-competition of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research 2019 later this year. You can download the “pre-proposal” here. It is called “Global Giving”. With the study I aim to describe and explain philanthropy in a large number of countries across the world. I invite you to review the “pre-proposal” and suggest improvements; please use the comments box below, or write to me directly.

You may have heard the story that university researchers these days spend a lot of their time writing grant proposals for funding competitions. Also you may have heard the story that chances of success in such competitions are getting smaller and smaller. These stories are all true. But the story you seldom hear is how such competitions actually work: they are a source of stress, frustration, burnouts and depression, and a complete waste of the precious time of the smartest people in the world. Recently, Gross and Bergstrom found that “the effort researchers waste in writing proposals may be comparable to the total scientific value of the research that the funding supports”.

Remember the last time you saw the announcement of prize winners in a research grant competition? I have not heard a single voice in the choir of the many near-winners speak up: “Hey, I did not get a grant!” It is almost as if everybody wins all the time. It is not common in academia to be open about failures to win. How many vitaes you have seen recently contain a list of failures? This is a grave distortion of reality. Less than one in ten applications is succesful. This means that for each winning proposal there are at least nine proposals that did not get funding. I want you to know how much time is wasted by this procedure. So here I will be sharing my experiences with the upcoming ‘vici’-competition.

single-shot-santa

First let me tell you about the funny name of the competition. The name ‘vici’ derives from roman emperor Caesar’s famous phrase in Latin: ‘veni, vidi, vici’, which he allegedly used to describe a swift victory. The translation is: “I came, I saw, I conquered”. The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (‘Nederlandse organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek’, NWO) thought it fitting to use these names as titles of their personal grant schemes. The so-called ‘talent schemes’ are very much about the personal qualities of the applicant. The scheme heralds heroes. The fascination with talent goes against the very nature of science, where the value of an idea, method or result is not measured by the personality of the author, but by its validity and reliability. That is why peer review is often double blind and evaluators do not know who wrote the research report or proposal.

plt132

Yet in the talent scheme, the personality of the applicant is very important. The fascination with talent creates Matthew effects, first described in 1968 by Robert K. Merton. The name ‘Matthew effect’ derives from the biblical phrase “For to him who has will more be given” (Mark 4:25). Simply stated: success breeds success. Recently, this effect has been documented in the talent scheme by Thijs Bol, Matthijs de Vaan and Arnout van de Rijt. When two applicants are equally good but one – by mere chance – receives a grant and the other does not, the ‘winner’ is ascribed with talent and the ‘loser’ is not. The ‘winner’ then gets a tremendously higher chance of receiving future grants.

As a member of committees for the ‘veni’ competition I have seen how this works in practice. Applicants received scores for the quality of their proposal from expert reviewers before we interviewed them. When we had minimal differences between the expert reviewer scores of candidates – differing only in the second decimal – personal characteristics of the researchers such as their self-confidence and manner of speaking during the interview often made the difference between ‘winners’ and ‘losers’. Ultimately, such minute differences add up to dramatically higher chances to be a full professor 10 years later, as the analysis in Figure 4 of the Bol, De Vaan & Van de Rijt paper shows.

matthew

My career is in this graph. In 2005, I won a ‘veni’-grant, the early career grant that the Figure above is about. The grant gave me a lot of freedom for research and I enjoyed it tremendously. I am pretty certain that the freedom that the grant gave me paved the way for the full professorship that I was recently awarded, thirteen years later. But back then, the size of the grant did not feel right. I felt sorry for those who did not make it. I knew I was privileged, and the research money I obtained was more than I needed. It would be much better to reduce the size of grants, so that a larger number of researchers can be funded. Yet the scheme is there, and it is a rare opportunity for researchers in the Netherlands to get funding for their own ideas.

This is my third and final application for a vici-grant. The rules for submission of proposals in this competition limit the number of attempts to three. Why am I going public with this final attempt?

The Open Science Revolution

You will have heard about open science. Most likely you will associate it with the struggle to publish research articles without paywalls, the exploitation of government funded scientists by commercial publishers, and perhaps even with Plan S. You may also associate open science with the struggle to get researchers to publish the data and the code they used to get to their results. Perhaps you have heard about open peer review of research publications. But most likely you will not have heard about open grant review. This is because it rarely happens. I am not the first to publish my proposal; the Open Grants repository currently contains 160 grant proposals. These proposals were shared after the competitions had run. The RIO Journal published 52 grant proposals. This is only a fraction of all grant proposals being created, submitted and reviewed. The many advantages of open science are not limited to funded research, they also apply to research ideas and proposals. By publishing my grant proposal before the competition, the expert reviews, the recommendations of the committee, my responses and experiences with the review process, I am opening up the procedure of grant review as much as possible.

Stages in the NWO Talent Scheme Grant Review Procedure

Each round of this competition takes almost a year, and proceeds in eight stages:

  1. Pre-application – March 26, 2019 <– this is where we are now
  2. Non-binding advice from committee: submit full proposal, or not – Summer 2019
  3. Full proposal – end of August 2019
  4. Expert reviews – October 2019
  5. Rebuttal to criticism in expert reviews – end of October 2019
  6. Selection for interview – November 2019
  7. Interview – January or February 2020
  8. Grant, or not – March 2020

If you’re curious to learn how this application procedure works in practice,
check back in a few weeks. Your comments and suggestions on the ideas above and the pre-proposal are most welcome!

Leave a comment

Filed under altruism, charitable organizations, data, economics, empathy, experiments, fundraising, happiness, helping, household giving, incentives, methodology, open science, organ donation, philanthropy, politics, principle of care, psychology, regression analysis, regulation, sociology, statistical analysis, survey research, taxes, trends, trust, volunteering, wealth

Hoe rijker, hoe minder vrijgevig?

Economen spreken van een basisgoed als de consumptie ervan relatief gesproken afneemt met het inkomen. Dit geldt heel duidelijk voor geven aan goede doelen. Hogere inkomens en vermogens doen in euro’s meer aan filantropie, maar als deel van hun inkomen en vermogen juist minder. In de jubileumeditie van Geven in Nederland (GIN) publiceerden Arjen de Wit, Pamala Wiepking en ik een special, waarin waarin we alle gegevens over giften uit de jaren 2001-2015 hebben gecombineerd en de inkomens in decielen (groepen van 10%) hebben ingedeeld. De invloed van uitschieters hebben we verminderd door de 1% hoogste waarnemingen te winsoriseren, dat wil zeggen ze te behandelen alsof ze net iets lager zijn. Met uitschieters is het plaatje overigens niet veel anders, de lijn loopt nog steeds naar beneden, maar minder recht.

Fig24

Het percentage van het inkomen dat huishoudens doneren aan goededoelenorganisaties neemt stelselmatig af met de hoogte van het inkomen. De 10% huishoudens die de laagste inkomens in Nederland verdienen, geven 1,16% van het inkomen aan goede doelen. Onder de hoogste 10% van de inkomens is dat 0,44%.

Vivienne van Leuken vroeg me per e-mail hoe dit komt.

Er zijn grofweg drie groepen verklaringen voor deze bevinding.

  1. Het ligt aan de gevers:
    • (a) rijkdom maakt mensen hebberig;
    • (b) hebberige mensen worden rijker.
  2. Het ligt aan de vragers:
    • (a) goededoelenorganisaties spreken de taal niet waarin ze de rijken kunnen overtuigen,
    • (b) goededoelenorganisaties hebben niet de juiste netwerken en
    • (c) goededoelenorganisaties doen niet de juiste proposities.
  3. Het ligt aan de samenleving:
    • (a) dat je moet geven is de norm, maar niet dat je meer moet geven naarmate je inkomen stijgt;
    • (b) voor verschillende soorten giften is er een geefstandaard, een bedrag dat normaal is om te geven. Die geefstandaard is een specifiek bedrag en niet relatief naar inkomen en vermogen;
    • (c) De vrijgevigheidsnorm dat je een deel van je inkomen zou moeten geven is in de loop van de geschiedenis verdwenen. Bovendien houdt met de ontkerkelijking een steeds kleiner deel van de bevolking zich aan zulke normen.

In elk van deze verklaringen zit wel een kern van waarheid, maar er is nog geen goed onderzoek dat aantoont in welke mate deze drie soorten verklaringen verantwoordelijk zijn voor de afname van de vrijgevigheid met inkomen en vermogen.

Leave a comment

Filed under charitable organizations, economics, fundraising, household giving, Netherlands, statistical analysis, survey research, wealth

The joys and challenges of working across disciplinary boundaries

Working with scholars from other disciplines can be a challenge.  The people you meet speak the same language, but the words they use sometimes mean different things. It takes time to learn the vocabulary, even though you know the words. Like the song: I’m an alien. I’m a legal alien: I’m an Englishman in New York.

Curiously, as a quantitative empirical sociologist attending academic research conferences in economics or psychology, I often feel like an amateur anthropologist. I observe customs with which I am unfamiliar, and try to blend in, participating in rituals and ceremonial celebrations of heroes unknown.

A common purpose binds us: the curiosity of a phenomenon unexplained, an intriguing puzzle, unsolved. Or the objective to get an article published in a journal that – before recent discoveries – was largely uncharted territory. Yes, there were dragons. But the joy of having slayed Reviewer 2!

 

Leave a comment

Filed under economics, psychology, sociology

De veerkracht van de filantropie

[*]

Deze tekst als pdf downloaden

Burgerkracht, lokale actie, de doe-democratie, de participatiesamenleving: we komen deze termen steeds vaker tegen in de politiek, de media en beleidsstukken van de overheid en adviesorganen. De termen fungeren in een fundamenteel debat over de verdeling van verantwoordelijkheid van burgers en de overheid voor het welzijn van anderen en de samenleving. Het uitgangspunt van deze stukken is de autonome, zelfredzame burger, die geen overheidsregeling nodig heeft om voor zichzelf, de eigen omgeving en de samenleving te zorgen.

Bij dit uitgangspunt past de filantropie, gedefinieerd als vrijwillige bijdragen van geld en tijd aan het algemeen nuttige doelen zoals gezondheid, cultuur, onderwijs, natuur en levensbeschouwing. Die bijdragen komen niet alleen van levende burgers, maar ook van overledenen (via nalatenschappen), van bedrijven, vermogensfondsen, en van goededoelenloterijen. In 2013 ging er in de filantropie in totaal zo’n €4,4 miljard om. In 2011 spraken het kabinet en de sector filantropie af intensiever samen te werken aan de kwaliteit van de samenleving. Door het activerende beleid doet de overheid een groter beroep op vrijwillige bijdragen in de vorm van geld en tijd en neemt de maatschappelijke betekenis van filantropie toe.

In theorie biedt voorziening van maatschappelijke doelen en collectieve arrangementen uit vrijwilligheid een voordeel boven verplichting via belasting of een andere vrijheidsbeperking. Via vrijwillige bijdragen krijgen burgers meer controle over de kwaliteit van de samenleving en kunnen ze daar ook met recht trots op zijn. Burgers dragen liever vrijwillig bij aan maatschappelijke doelen dan via een verplichte belasting of via verplichte maatschappelijke dienstverlening.

De voorkeur voor vrijwillige bijdragen is niet alleen psychologisch in de vorm van een ‘goed gevoel’. Een experiment van Harbaugh, Mayr en Burghart (2007) maakte deze voorkeur zichtbaar door middel van hersenscans van Amerikaanse vrouwen die een grotere activiteit in het ‘genotscentrum’ in de hersenen vertoonden als zij een bedrag aan een goed doel gaven dan wanneer hetzelfde bedrag namens hen door de experimentleiders werd gegeven. Er kan ook voor burgers een materieel voordeel zitten aan vrijwillige bijdragen in de vorm van vrijwilligerswerk. Er is veel onderzoek dat laat zien dat vrijwilligers gelukkiger zijn, grotere sociale netwerken hebben, langer gezond blijven en uiteindelijk langer leven dan maatschappelijk minder betrokken burgers.

Filantropie verhoogt de kwaliteit van leven omdat zij zich richt op de aanpak van maatschappelijke problemen en de realisatie van maatschappelijke idealen. Het besef groeit dat effectieve oplossingen een goede samenwerking tussen overheden, bedrijven en burgers vereisen. Een eenzijdige aanpak van bovenaf door een nationale overheid ligt steeds minder voor de hand. Bijdragen van burgers en bedrijven, in de vorm van maatschappelijk verantwoord ondernemen, vrijwilligerswerk, crowdfunding en actieve burgerparticipatie zijn welkom op uiteenlopende gebieden als integratie, cultuur, zorg, veiligheid, natuurbehoud en duurzaamheid.

De aandacht voor filantropie van de overheid is een herontdekking van een rijk verleden. Een mooi historisch voorbeeld is de manier waarop volgens de Amerikaanse journalist Russell Shorto (2005) de bouw van de Walstraat in Nieuw Amsterdam werd gefinancierd. Op Wall Street in New York, waar nu het centrum van het kapitalisme is gevestigd, stond ooit een muur die de inwoners van de stad tegen de indianen, de Engelsen en de Zweden moest beschermen. Omdat er geen overheid was die belasting kon heffen werd de bouw van de wal gefinancierd met vrijwillige bijdragen van de burgers van Nieuw Amsterdam, waarbij van de meer vermogende inwoners een grotere bijdrage werd verwacht. Zij hadden ook meer te verliezen bij een inval. Latere voorbeelden, dichterbij huis, zijn het Vondelpark, de Vrije Universiteit en de grote musea in Amsterdam: voor een groot deel gefinancierd met schenkingen van vermogende particulieren.

Met het beroep op burgers keert de overheid terug naar deze tijden. De omstandigheden zijn in sommige opzichten gelijkaardig. Opnieuw is er grote welvaart in Nederland, die opnieuw zeer ongelijk verdeeld is. Er zijn echter ook grote verschillen. De vraag om vrijwillige bijdragen komt in een tijd waarin burgers gewend zijn aan een overheid die voor hen zorgt. Bovendien komt de vraag in een tijd van economische onzekerheid en bezuinigingen op overheidsuitgaven. Het beroep op vrijwillige bijdragen vraagt veerkracht van burgers. De Rockefeller Foundation (2015) definieert veerkracht als de capaciteit van mensen, gemeenschappen en instituties om zich voor te bereiden op schokken en langdurige belasting, zich daar tegen te verzetten en ervan te herstellen. Veerkracht komt niet alleen tot uiting in zelfredzaamheid, maar ook in het mobiliseren van hulp en het aanboren van nieuwe hulpbronnen. Het gevoel van gemeenschap, het besef dat je met elkaar meer kunt bereiken dan alleen, en het vertrouwen in anderen helpen daar bij. Deze factoren zijn ook cruciaal voor de filantropie.

De sector filantropie is in Nederland in de afgelopen decennia niet gegroeid vanuit tegenslag en bedreiging. Integendeel. In de jaren ’90 hadden we geen last van crisis en groeide de sector als kool, nog veel harder dan de economie. De sector organiseerde en professionaliseerde zich. Er kwamen brancheverenigingen, gedragscodes, keurmerken, toezichthouders, er kwamen opleidingen en er kwam onderzoek dat de sector filantropie in kaart bracht. Die gehele ontwikkeling vond plaats in het laatste decennium van de jaren ’90 zonder dat er grote problemen waren. De filantropie is groot geworden in een tijd van voorspoed, zonder veel bemoeienis en grotendeels buiten het blikveld van de overheid. Vanuit de betrokkenheid van Nederlanders. Niet zozeer om maatschappelijke problemen op te lossen, maar ook – en misschien wel vooral – om idealen te verwezenlijken. Filantropie is de uiting bij uitstek van de veerkracht van de samenleving. Uit de filantropie van een samenleving blijkt waar burgers om geven, wat zij goede doelen vinden en hoeveel zij ervoor over hebben.

De economische crisis waarin Nederland in 2009 terecht is gekomen heeft een beroep gedaan op de veerkracht van burgers. Het zijn niet zozeer de korte termijn fluctuaties in de hoogte van inkomens, de werkloosheid of het consumentenvertrouwen die samenhangen met de lange termijn trend in het geefgedrag. Het gaat eerder om de economische zekerheid op de lange termijn: de waarde van giften van geld aan goede doelen houdt sinds 1965 gelijke tred met de ontwikkeling van de vermogens van Nederlanders. Sinds 1985 volgt de ontwikkeling in de hoogte van de giften in Nederland vrijwel exact de ontwikkeling in de hoogte van de waarde van onroerend goed.

consumptie_filantropie_onroerendgoed_08_13

Consumptieve bestedingen van huishoudens (nationaal) en totaal vermogen van huishoudens in de vorm van onroerend goed volgens het CBS en de waarde van filantropie door huishoudens volgens Geven in Nederland (niet gecorrigeerd voor inflatie)

De filantropie in Nederland lijkt minder gevoelig te zijn voor economische tegenwind dan die van de Verenigde Staten en het Verenigd Koninkrijk, waar de inkomsten voor goededoelenorganisaties flink daalden in 2008 en 2009 en daarna nauwelijks stegen. Pas in 2012 zagen de goededoelenorganisaties in de VS hun inkomsten weer toenemen. In Nederland bleef het recessie-effect uit tot 2011. Bovendien was het effect beperkt. We zien nu in 2013 weer een stijging van de giften. Dit is opmerkelijk omdat de waarde van onroerend goed in 2013 nog daalde. Ook de betrokkenheid van bedrijven bij goede doelen blijft hoog, ondanks de crisis. Het totaalbedrag aan giften en sponsoring is vrijwel gelijk gebleven.

Ook het overheidsbeleid van de afgelopen jaren heeft voor terugslag gezorgd. De overheid heeft taken gedecentraliseerd naar gemeenten, waardoor een groter beroep wordt gedaan op burgers om voor henzelf en hun naasten te zorgen. In de nieuwe cijfers over vrijwilligerswerk zien we een achteruitgang. In 2010 deed nog 41% vrijwilligerswerk, in 2014 is dat gedaald naar 37%. Ook het aantal uren dat vrijwilligers actief zijn is gedaald, naar 18 uur per maand. In 2012 was dit nog 21 uur. We zien wel veerkracht onder de loyale groep vrijwilligers, die juist actiever is geworden. Er is echter een grens aan de inzet van de trouwe vrijwilliger. Het toenemende belang dat de overheid in de participatiesamenleving aan mantelzorg en informele hulp hecht vormt op termijn een bedreiging voor het vrijwilligerswerk. We zien in het Geven in Nederland onderzoek dat informele hulp, mantelzorg en vrijwilligerswerk communicerende vaten zijn. Het hemd is dan nader dan de rok. Mensen stoppen vaker met vrijwilligerswerk als ze mantelzorgtaken erbij krijgen.

De overheid heeft bezuinigd op subsidies voor specifieke goededoelenorganisaties. Met name in de cultuursector hebben instellingen lastige keuzes moeten maken. Door de bezuinigingen op culturele instellingen is een beroep gedaan op de veerkracht in de sector cultuur. We zien hier grote verschillen tussen instellingen. De grotere musea van ons land zijn met behoud van subsidie in staat geweest om ook nog meer geld uit de markt te halen. Voor veel andere instellingen staan de inkomsten door bezuinigingen onder druk en zij lijken nog niet goed in staat meer inkomsten uit fondsenwerving en commerciële inkomsten te halen. Helaas blijkt ook bij de gevers de veerkracht beperkt te zijn. Vooralsnog zijn de bezuinigingen op culturele instellingen veel groter dan de toename in de giften aan culturele instellingen. Vermogende gevers zijn niet van plan meer te gaan geven aan cultuur.

De komende jaren zal duidelijk worden of vrijwillige bijdragen voldoende zijn om de schokken op te vangen die de economische crisis en de bezuinigingen door de overheid hebben veroorzaakt.  Zijn we als samenleving in staat deze betrokkenheid te mobiliseren? De aantrekkingskracht van het werk van goededoelenorganisaties is daarbij niet voldoende. Vermogende particulieren verlangen een meer zakelijke manier van werken dan gebruikelijk is bij veel goede doelen en hebben behoefte aan nieuwe financiële instrumenten die zakelijke investeringen in de kwaliteit van de samenleving mogelijk maken. Denk daarbij aan crowdfunding, social impact bonds, en ‘venture philanthropy’. De lage rentestand maken deze alternatieve vormen van investeren aantrekkelijker. In de geest van het convenant uit 2011 zou de sector filantropie in overleg met de overheid en het bedrijfsleven deze instrumenten verder moeten ontwikkelen.

Literatuur

Bekkers, R., Schuyt, T.N.M. & Gouwenberg, B.M. (2015, Red). Geven in Nederland 2015: Giften, Nalatenschappen, Sponsoring en Vrijwilligerswerk. Amsterdam: Reed Business.

Harbaugh, W.T. , Mayr , U., & Burghart, D.R. (2007). Neural responses to taxation and voluntary giving reveal motives for charitable donations. Science, 316: 1622-1625.

Rockefeller Foundation (2015). Resilience. https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/our-work/topics/resilience/

Shorto, R. (2005). The Island At the Center of the World. New York: Random House/Vintage.

[*] Deze bijdrage is deels gebaseerd op gegevens uit Geven in Nederland 2015 (Bekkers, Schuyt & Gouwenberg, 2015).

1 Comment

Filed under altruism, Center for Philanthropic Studies, charitable organizations, economics, foundations, household giving, Netherlands, philanthropy, taxes, Uncategorized, volunteering