Monthly Archives: January 2020

Revolutionizing Philanthropy Research Webinar

January 30, 11am-12pm (EST) / 5-6pm (CET) / 9-10pm (IST)

Why do people give to the benefit of others – or keep their resources to themselves? What is the core evidence on giving that holds across cultures? How does giving vary between cultures? How has the field of research on giving changed in the past decades?

10 years after the publication of “A Literature Review of Empirical Studies of Philanthropy: Eight Mechanisms that Drive Charitable Giving” in Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, it is time for an even more comprehensive effort to review the evidence base on giving. We envision an ambitious approach, using the most innovative tools and data science algorithms available to visualize the structure of research networks, identify theoretical foundations and provide a critical assessment of previous research.

We are inviting you to join this exciting endeavor in an open, global, cross-disciplinary collaboration. All expertise is very much welcome – from any discipline, country, or methodology. The webinar consists of four parts:

  1. Welcome: by moderator Pamala Wiepking, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and VU Amsterdam;
  2. The strategy for collecting research evidence on giving from publications: by Ji Ma, University of Texas;
  3. Tools we plan to use for the analyses: by René Bekkers, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam;
  4. The project structure, and opportunities to participate: by Pamala Wiepking.

The webinar is interactive. You can provide comments and feedback during each presentation. After each presentation, the moderator selects key questions for discussion.

We ask you to please register for the webinar here: https://iu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_faEQe2UtQAq3JldcokFU3g.

Registration is free. After you register, you will receive an automated message that includes a URL for the webinar, as well as international calling numbers. In addition, a recording of the webinar will be available soon after on the Open Science Framework Project page: https://osf.io/46e8x/

Please feel free to share with everyone who may be interested, and do let us know if you have any questions or suggestions at this stage.

We look forward to hopefully seeing you on January 30!

You can register at https://iu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_faEQe2UtQAq3JldcokFU3g

René Bekkers, Ji Ma, Pamala Wiepking, Arjen de Wit, and Sasha Zarins

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Filed under altruism, bequests, charitable organizations, crowdfunding, economics, experiments, fundraising, helping, household giving, informal giving, open science, philanthropy, psychology, remittances, sociology, survey research, taxes, volunteering

The Magic of Science

Dinosaurs are like magic. They capture the attention because of their size and sharp teeth. The fact they are no longer among us may also contribute to their popularity. In science, we still have dinosaurs. They do date back to the prehistoric age, when scientists could build careers on undisclosed data and procedures. But we have entered the new age of open science, with comets and earthquakes causing dark clouds in the sky and blocking our view of the sun.

dino_bummer

In the prehistoric age, a lot of science was like magic. The wizard waved his wand, and…. poof: there was the result that only the wizard could reproduce. If nobody can repeat your trick, it’s not science. When you dig up old research, you are stuck with a lot of ‘magic’. Make sure you can detect it.

magic

Unlike real magic, the tricks of illusionists are highly reproducible. It may take some time to learn tricks and you will need the appropriate equipment, but if you know the secret recipe, you can dress up like a magician, and perform the very same act you could not figure out when you were in the audience.

Needless to say, it is our collective responsibility to disclose all the tricks and equipment we use in our research. Here’s a list of things we can do to make this happen.

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Filed under open science