Lunch Talk: “Generalized Trust Through Civic Engagement? Evidence from Five National Panel Studies”

Does civic engagement breed trust? According to a popular version of social capital theory, civic engagement should produce generalized trust among citizens. In a new paper accepted for publication in Political Psychology, Erik van Ingen (Tilburg University) and I put this theory to the test by examining the causal connection between civic engagement and generalized trust using multiple methods and multiple (prospective) panel datasets. We found participants to be more trusting. This was mostly likely caused by selection effects: the causal effects of civic engagement on trust were very small or non-significant. In the cases where small causal effects were found, they turned out not to last. We found no differences across types of organizations and only minor variations across countries.

At the PARIS colloquium of the Department of Sociology at VU University on November 12, 2013 (Room Z531, 13.00-14.00), I will not just be talking about this paper published in Political Behavior and about the new paper forthcoming in Political Psychology (here is the prepublication version). In addition to a substantive story about a research project there is also a story about the process of getting a paper accepted with a null-finding that goes against received wisdom. This story is quite informative about the publication factory that we are all in.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under data, psychology, survey research, trust, volunteering

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s