Giving in the Netherlands tops €4.7 billion

The total value of donations to nonprofit organizations in the Netherlandshas increased to €4.7 billion in 2009. Despite the economic crisis, household giving stabilized at €1.9 billion and corporate giving increased to 1.7 billion. The figures were published today by the Center for Philanthropic Studies at VU University Amsterdam. A summary of principle findings is available here: https://renebekkers.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/summary_gin2011.pdf 

The new Giving in the Netherlands study includes a special report on giving by high net worth households with an average net worth of €1.4 million. The report shows that giving by high net worth households is considerably higher than in the total Dutch population. Annual donations averaged almost €2,800 per household in the high net worth sample versus €210 in the random sample of households.

The total value of corporate giving increased due to an increase in the value of sponsoring and partnerships with nonprofit organizations. While corporate philanthropy declined to just below €400 million, the value of donations in the form of sponsorships and partnerships increased to €1.3 billion.

The new figures are based on surveys among corporations (n=1,183), and households (n=3,495). The households surveyed include a random sample of the population (n=1,692), and oversamples of high net worth households (n=1,216) and immigrants (n=587).

For more information, contact the Center for Philanthropic Studies at gin.fsw@vu.nl or visit www.giving.nl

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1 Comment

Filed under corporate social responsibility, household giving, volunteering

One response to “Giving in the Netherlands tops €4.7 billion

  1. Pingback: You are welcome to use our data | Rene Bekkers

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